This paper aims to explore the impact of "mountain pasture product" information on the acceptability of local protected designation of origin (PDO) cheese produced from the raw milk of cows grazing in mountain pastures (P) or reared in valley floor stalls (S). A total of 156 consumers (55% males, mean age 41 years) were asked to evaluate their overall liking on a 9-point hedonic scale of four samples: Cheeses P and S were presented twice with different information about the origin of the milk (cows grazing on mountain pasture or reared in a valley floor stall). Demographics, consumer habits, and opinions on mountain pasture practice (MPP), attitudes towards sustainability, and food-related behaviours (i.e., diet, food waste production, organic food, and zero food miles products purchase) were recorded and used to segment consumers. The cheeses were all considered more than acceptable, even though they were found to be significantly different in colour and texture by instrumental analyses. In the whole consumer panel, the cheese P was preferred, while in consumer segments less attentive to product characteristics, this effect was not significant. External information had a strong effect: Overall liking was significantly higher in cheeses presented as "mountain pasture product", both in the whole panel and in consumer segments with different attitudes (except for those with a low opinion of MPP).

Does the 'Mountain Pasture Product' Claim Affect Local Cheese Acceptability? / Endrizzi, Isabella; Cliceri, Danny; Menghi, Leonardo; Aprea, Eugenio; Gasperi, Flavia. - In: FOODS. - ISSN 2304-8158. - 10:3(2021), pp. 68201-68219. [10.3390/foods10030682]

Does the 'Mountain Pasture Product' Claim Affect Local Cheese Acceptability?

Endrizzi, Isabella;Cliceri, Danny;Menghi, Leonardo;Aprea, Eugenio;Gasperi, Flavia
2021

Abstract

This paper aims to explore the impact of "mountain pasture product" information on the acceptability of local protected designation of origin (PDO) cheese produced from the raw milk of cows grazing in mountain pastures (P) or reared in valley floor stalls (S). A total of 156 consumers (55% males, mean age 41 years) were asked to evaluate their overall liking on a 9-point hedonic scale of four samples: Cheeses P and S were presented twice with different information about the origin of the milk (cows grazing on mountain pasture or reared in a valley floor stall). Demographics, consumer habits, and opinions on mountain pasture practice (MPP), attitudes towards sustainability, and food-related behaviours (i.e., diet, food waste production, organic food, and zero food miles products purchase) were recorded and used to segment consumers. The cheeses were all considered more than acceptable, even though they were found to be significantly different in colour and texture by instrumental analyses. In the whole consumer panel, the cheese P was preferred, while in consumer segments less attentive to product characteristics, this effect was not significant. External information had a strong effect: Overall liking was significantly higher in cheeses presented as "mountain pasture product", both in the whole panel and in consumer segments with different attitudes (except for those with a low opinion of MPP).
3
Endrizzi, Isabella; Cliceri, Danny; Menghi, Leonardo; Aprea, Eugenio; Gasperi, Flavia
Does the 'Mountain Pasture Product' Claim Affect Local Cheese Acceptability? / Endrizzi, Isabella; Cliceri, Danny; Menghi, Leonardo; Aprea, Eugenio; Gasperi, Flavia. - In: FOODS. - ISSN 2304-8158. - 10:3(2021), pp. 68201-68219. [10.3390/foods10030682]
File in questo prodotto:
File Dimensione Formato  
Endrizzi et al. - 2021 - Does the ‘Mountain Pasture Product’ Claim Affect L.pdf

accesso aperto

Tipologia: Versione editoriale (Publisher’s layout)
Licenza: Creative commons
Dimensione 763.6 kB
Formato Adobe PDF
763.6 kB Adobe PDF Visualizza/Apri

I documenti in IRIS sono protetti da copyright e tutti i diritti sono riservati, salvo diversa indicazione

Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11572/300338
Citazioni
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.pmc??? 2
  • Scopus 3
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.isi??? 3
social impact