Cerebral asymmetry is critical for typical brain function and development; at the same time, altered brain lateralization seems to be associated with neuropsychiatric disorders. Zebrafish are increasingly emerging as model species to study brain lateralization, using asymmetric development of the habenula, a phylogenetically old brain structure associated with social and emotional processing, to investigate the relationship between brain asymmetry and social behavior. We exposed 5-h post-fertilization zebrafish embryos to valproic acid (VPA), a compound used to model the core signs of ASD in many vertebrate species, and assessed social interaction, visual lateralization and gene expression in the thalamus and the telencephalon. VPA-exposed zebrafish exhibit social deficits and a deconstruction of social visual laterality to the mirror. We also observe changes in the asymmetric expression of the epithalamic marker leftover and in the size of the dorsolateral part of the habenula in adult zebrafish. Our data indicate that VPA exposure neutralizes the animals’ visual field bias, with a complete loss of the left-eye use bias in front of their own mirror image, and alters brain asymmetric gene expression and morphology, opening new perspectives to investigate brain lateralization and its link to atypical social cognitive development.

Valproic acid exposure affects social visual lateralization and asymmetric gene expression in zebrafish larvae / Messina, Andrea; Sovrano, Valeria Anna; Baratti, Greta; Musa, Alessia; Gobbo, Alessandra; Adiletta, Alice; Sgadò, Paola. - In: SCIENTIFIC REPORTS. - ISSN 2045-2322. - ELETTRONICO. - 2024, 14:(2024), pp. 447401-447415. [10.1038/s41598-024-54356-7]

Valproic acid exposure affects social visual lateralization and asymmetric gene expression in zebrafish larvae

Messina, Andrea;Sovrano, Valeria Anna
;
Baratti, Greta;Gobbo, Alessandra;Adiletta, Alice;Sgadò, Paola
2024-01-01

Abstract

Cerebral asymmetry is critical for typical brain function and development; at the same time, altered brain lateralization seems to be associated with neuropsychiatric disorders. Zebrafish are increasingly emerging as model species to study brain lateralization, using asymmetric development of the habenula, a phylogenetically old brain structure associated with social and emotional processing, to investigate the relationship between brain asymmetry and social behavior. We exposed 5-h post-fertilization zebrafish embryos to valproic acid (VPA), a compound used to model the core signs of ASD in many vertebrate species, and assessed social interaction, visual lateralization and gene expression in the thalamus and the telencephalon. VPA-exposed zebrafish exhibit social deficits and a deconstruction of social visual laterality to the mirror. We also observe changes in the asymmetric expression of the epithalamic marker leftover and in the size of the dorsolateral part of the habenula in adult zebrafish. Our data indicate that VPA exposure neutralizes the animals’ visual field bias, with a complete loss of the left-eye use bias in front of their own mirror image, and alters brain asymmetric gene expression and morphology, opening new perspectives to investigate brain lateralization and its link to atypical social cognitive development.
2024
Messina, Andrea; Sovrano, Valeria Anna; Baratti, Greta; Musa, Alessia; Gobbo, Alessandra; Adiletta, Alice; Sgadò, Paola
Valproic acid exposure affects social visual lateralization and asymmetric gene expression in zebrafish larvae / Messina, Andrea; Sovrano, Valeria Anna; Baratti, Greta; Musa, Alessia; Gobbo, Alessandra; Adiletta, Alice; Sgadò, Paola. - In: SCIENTIFIC REPORTS. - ISSN 2045-2322. - ELETTRONICO. - 2024, 14:(2024), pp. 447401-447415. [10.1038/s41598-024-54356-7]
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11572/403410
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