Responses of the microbiota to diet are highly personalized but mechanistically not well understood because many metabolic capabilities and interactions of human gut microorganisms are unknown. Here we show that sulfoquinovose (SQ), a sulfonated monosaccharide omnipresent in green vegetables, is a selective yet relevant substrate for few but ubiquitous bacteria in the human gut. In human feces and in defined co-culture, Eubacterium rectale and Bilophila wadsworthia used recently identified pathways to cooperatively catabolize SQ with 2,3-dihydroxypropane-1-sulfonate as a transient intermediate to hydrogen sulfide (H2S), a key intestinal metabolite with disparate effects on host health. SQ-degradation capability is encoded in almost half of E. rectale genomes but otherwise sparsely distributed among microbial species in the human intestine. However, re-analysis of fecal metatranscriptome datasets of four human cohorts showed that SQ degradation (mostly from E. rectale and Faecalibacterium prausnitzii) and H2S production (mostly from B. wadsworthia) pathways were expressed abundantly across various health states, demonstrating that these microbial functions are core attributes of the human gut. The discovery of green-diet-derived SQ as an exclusive microbial nutrient and an additional source of H2S in the human gut highlights the role of individual dietary compounds and organosulfur metabolism on microbial activity and has implications for precision editing of the gut microbiota by dietary and prebiotic interventions.

Sulfoquinovose is a select nutrient of prominent bacteria and a source of hydrogen sulfide in the human gut / Hanson, Buck T; Dimitri Kits, K; Löffler, Jessica; Burrichter, Anna G; Fiedler, Alexander; Denger, Karin; Frommeyer, Benjamin; Herbold, Craig W; Rattei, Thomas; Karcher, Nicolai; Segata, Nicola; Schleheck, David; Loy, Alexander. - In: THE ISME JOURNAL. - ISSN 1751-7362. - 15:9(2021), pp. 2779-2791. [10.1038/s41396-021-00968-0]

Sulfoquinovose is a select nutrient of prominent bacteria and a source of hydrogen sulfide in the human gut

Karcher, Nicolai;Segata, Nicola;
2021-01-01

Abstract

Responses of the microbiota to diet are highly personalized but mechanistically not well understood because many metabolic capabilities and interactions of human gut microorganisms are unknown. Here we show that sulfoquinovose (SQ), a sulfonated monosaccharide omnipresent in green vegetables, is a selective yet relevant substrate for few but ubiquitous bacteria in the human gut. In human feces and in defined co-culture, Eubacterium rectale and Bilophila wadsworthia used recently identified pathways to cooperatively catabolize SQ with 2,3-dihydroxypropane-1-sulfonate as a transient intermediate to hydrogen sulfide (H2S), a key intestinal metabolite with disparate effects on host health. SQ-degradation capability is encoded in almost half of E. rectale genomes but otherwise sparsely distributed among microbial species in the human intestine. However, re-analysis of fecal metatranscriptome datasets of four human cohorts showed that SQ degradation (mostly from E. rectale and Faecalibacterium prausnitzii) and H2S production (mostly from B. wadsworthia) pathways were expressed abundantly across various health states, demonstrating that these microbial functions are core attributes of the human gut. The discovery of green-diet-derived SQ as an exclusive microbial nutrient and an additional source of H2S in the human gut highlights the role of individual dietary compounds and organosulfur metabolism on microbial activity and has implications for precision editing of the gut microbiota by dietary and prebiotic interventions.
2021
9
Hanson, Buck T; Dimitri Kits, K; Löffler, Jessica; Burrichter, Anna G; Fiedler, Alexander; Denger, Karin; Frommeyer, Benjamin; Herbold, Craig W; Rattei, Thomas; Karcher, Nicolai; Segata, Nicola; Schleheck, David; Loy, Alexander
Sulfoquinovose is a select nutrient of prominent bacteria and a source of hydrogen sulfide in the human gut / Hanson, Buck T; Dimitri Kits, K; Löffler, Jessica; Burrichter, Anna G; Fiedler, Alexander; Denger, Karin; Frommeyer, Benjamin; Herbold, Craig W; Rattei, Thomas; Karcher, Nicolai; Segata, Nicola; Schleheck, David; Loy, Alexander. - In: THE ISME JOURNAL. - ISSN 1751-7362. - 15:9(2021), pp. 2779-2791. [10.1038/s41396-021-00968-0]
File in questo prodotto:
File Dimensione Formato  
s41396-021-00968-0 (1).pdf

accesso aperto

Tipologia: Versione editoriale (Publisher’s layout)
Licenza: Creative commons
Dimensione 2.67 MB
Formato Adobe PDF
2.67 MB Adobe PDF Visualizza/Apri

I documenti in IRIS sono protetti da copyright e tutti i diritti sono riservati, salvo diversa indicazione

Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11572/355069
Citazioni
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.pmc??? 11
  • Scopus 29
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.isi??? 29
social impact