Previous research has identified that both low- and high-socio-economic groups tend to be dehumanized. However, groups that have a deprived position are more willing to interiorize the negative perceptions that others have about them compared with affluent groups. In this project, we address the role of meta-(de)humanization (the perceived humanity one thinks is ascribed or denied to one’s group) based on socio-economic status differences and its influence in the perceived psychological well-being. We conducted two studies: In Study 1 (correlational, N = 990), we analysed the relationship between socio-economic status, meta-dehumanization, and well-being. Results indicated that lower socio-economic status positively predicted more meta-dehumanization and worse well-being. Moreover, meta-dehumanization mediated the relationship between socio-economic status and well-being. In Study 2 (experimental, N = 354), we manipulated socio-economic status (low-, middle-, and high-socio-economic status conditions) to evaluate its influence on meta-dehumanization and well-being. Results indicated that individuals of low (vs. higher)-socio-economic status perceived more meta-dehumanization and reported worse well-being. Finally, a multicategorical mediational analysis indicated that low (vs. middle or high)-socio-economic status led to worse well-being through higher perceived meta-dehumanization. We discuss differences in perceived meta-(de)humanization based on groups’ socio-economic status and implications on the population’s well-being.

Lacking socio-economic status reduces subjective well-being through perceptions of meta-dehumanization / Sainz, Mario; Martinez, Rocio; Moya, Miguel; Rodriguez-Bailon, Rosa; Vaes, Jeroen. - In: BRITISH JOURNAL OF SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGY. - ISSN 0144-6665. - 60:2(2021), pp. 470-489. [10.1111/bjso.12412]

Lacking socio-economic status reduces subjective well-being through perceptions of meta-dehumanization

Vaes, Jeroen
2021-01-01

Abstract

Previous research has identified that both low- and high-socio-economic groups tend to be dehumanized. However, groups that have a deprived position are more willing to interiorize the negative perceptions that others have about them compared with affluent groups. In this project, we address the role of meta-(de)humanization (the perceived humanity one thinks is ascribed or denied to one’s group) based on socio-economic status differences and its influence in the perceived psychological well-being. We conducted two studies: In Study 1 (correlational, N = 990), we analysed the relationship between socio-economic status, meta-dehumanization, and well-being. Results indicated that lower socio-economic status positively predicted more meta-dehumanization and worse well-being. Moreover, meta-dehumanization mediated the relationship between socio-economic status and well-being. In Study 2 (experimental, N = 354), we manipulated socio-economic status (low-, middle-, and high-socio-economic status conditions) to evaluate its influence on meta-dehumanization and well-being. Results indicated that individuals of low (vs. higher)-socio-economic status perceived more meta-dehumanization and reported worse well-being. Finally, a multicategorical mediational analysis indicated that low (vs. middle or high)-socio-economic status led to worse well-being through higher perceived meta-dehumanization. We discuss differences in perceived meta-(de)humanization based on groups’ socio-economic status and implications on the population’s well-being.
2021
2
Sainz, Mario; Martinez, Rocio; Moya, Miguel; Rodriguez-Bailon, Rosa; Vaes, Jeroen
Lacking socio-economic status reduces subjective well-being through perceptions of meta-dehumanization / Sainz, Mario; Martinez, Rocio; Moya, Miguel; Rodriguez-Bailon, Rosa; Vaes, Jeroen. - In: BRITISH JOURNAL OF SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGY. - ISSN 0144-6665. - 60:2(2021), pp. 470-489. [10.1111/bjso.12412]
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11572/290227
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