The present research aims at gaining a better insight on the psychological barriers to the introduction of social robots in society at large. Based on social psychological research on intergroup distinctiveness, we suggested that concerns toward this technology are related to how we define and defend our human identity. A threat to distinctiveness hypothesis was advanced. We predicted that too much perceived similarity between social robots and humans triggers concerns about the negative impact of this technology on humans, as a group, and their identity more generally because similarity blurs category boundaries, undermining human uniqueness. Focusing on the appearance of robots, in two studies we tested the validity of this hypothesis. In both studies, participants were presented with pictures of three types of robots that differed in their anthropomorphic appearance varying from no resemblance to humans (mechanical robots), to some body shape resemblance (biped humanoids) to a perfect copy of human body (androids). Androids raised the highest concerns for the potential damage to humans, followed by humanoids and then mechanical robots. In Study 1, we further demonstrated that robot anthropomorphic appearance (and not the attribution of mind and human nature) was responsible for the perceived damage that the robot could cause. In Study 2, we gained a clearer insight in the processes underlying this effect by showing that androids were also judged as most threatening to the human–robot distinction and that this perception was responsible for the higher perceived damage to humans. Implications of these findings for social robotics are discussed.

Blurring human–machine distinctions: anthropomorphic appearance in social robots as a threat to human distinctiveness / Ferrari, Francesco; Paladino, Maria Paola; Jetten, Jolanda. - In: INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF SOCIAL ROBOTICS. - ISSN 1875-4791. - 8:2(2016), pp. 287-302. [10.1007/s12369-016-0338-y]

Blurring human–machine distinctions: anthropomorphic appearance in social robots as a threat to human distinctiveness

Ferrari, Francesco;Paladino, Maria Paola;
2016-01-01

Abstract

The present research aims at gaining a better insight on the psychological barriers to the introduction of social robots in society at large. Based on social psychological research on intergroup distinctiveness, we suggested that concerns toward this technology are related to how we define and defend our human identity. A threat to distinctiveness hypothesis was advanced. We predicted that too much perceived similarity between social robots and humans triggers concerns about the negative impact of this technology on humans, as a group, and their identity more generally because similarity blurs category boundaries, undermining human uniqueness. Focusing on the appearance of robots, in two studies we tested the validity of this hypothesis. In both studies, participants were presented with pictures of three types of robots that differed in their anthropomorphic appearance varying from no resemblance to humans (mechanical robots), to some body shape resemblance (biped humanoids) to a perfect copy of human body (androids). Androids raised the highest concerns for the potential damage to humans, followed by humanoids and then mechanical robots. In Study 1, we further demonstrated that robot anthropomorphic appearance (and not the attribution of mind and human nature) was responsible for the perceived damage that the robot could cause. In Study 2, we gained a clearer insight in the processes underlying this effect by showing that androids were also judged as most threatening to the human–robot distinction and that this perception was responsible for the higher perceived damage to humans. Implications of these findings for social robotics are discussed.
2016
2
Ferrari, Francesco; Paladino, Maria Paola; Jetten, Jolanda
Blurring human–machine distinctions: anthropomorphic appearance in social robots as a threat to human distinctiveness / Ferrari, Francesco; Paladino, Maria Paola; Jetten, Jolanda. - In: INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF SOCIAL ROBOTICS. - ISSN 1875-4791. - 8:2(2016), pp. 287-302. [10.1007/s12369-016-0338-y]
File in questo prodotto:
File Dimensione Formato  
Blurring Human–Machine Distinctions ....pdf

Solo gestori archivio

Tipologia: Versione editoriale (Publisher’s layout)
Licenza: Tutti i diritti riservati (All rights reserved)
Dimensione 602.41 kB
Formato Adobe PDF
602.41 kB Adobe PDF   Visualizza/Apri
!!! 20200811 per un elearning di qualità copia (1).pdf

accesso aperto

Tipologia: Post-print referato (Refereed author’s manuscript)
Licenza: Tutti i diritti riservati (All rights reserved)
Dimensione 221.91 kB
Formato Adobe PDF
221.91 kB Adobe PDF Visualizza/Apri

I documenti in IRIS sono protetti da copyright e tutti i diritti sono riservati, salvo diversa indicazione

Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11572/143600
Citazioni
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.pmc??? ND
  • Scopus 186
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.isi??? 148
social impact