In this paper, the wave propagation on a plane dry bottom after a dam break is analysed. Two mathematical models have been used and compared with each other for simulating such a dam-break scenario. First, the fully three-dimensional Navier–Stokes equations for a weakly compressible fluid have been solved using the new smooth particle hydrodynamics formulation, recently proposed by Ferrari et al. (Comput. Fluids, vol. 38, 2009, p. 1203). Second, the two-dimensional shallow water equations (SWEs) are solved using a third-order weighted essentially non-oscillatory finitevolume scheme. The numerical results are critically compared against the laboratory measurements provided by Fraccarollo & Toro (J. Hydraul. Res., vol. 33, 1995, p. 843). The experimental data provide the temporal evolution of the pressure field, the water depth and the vertical velocity profile at 40 gauges, located in the reservoir and in front of the gate. Our analysis reveals the shortcomings of SWEs in the initial stages of the dam-break phenomenon in reproducing many important flow features of the unsteady free-surface flow: the shallow water model predicts a complex wave structure and a wavy evolution of local free-surface elevations in the reservoir that can be clearly identified to be only model artefacts. However, the quasi-incompressible Navier–Stokes model reproduces well the high gradients in the flow field and predicts the cycles of simultaneous rapid decreasing and frozen stages of the free surface in the tank along with the velocity oscillations. Asymptotically, i.e. for ‘large times’, the shallow water model and the weakly compressible Navier–Stokes model agree well with the experimental data, since the classical SWE assumptions are satisfied only at large times.

Three-Dimensional Flow Evolution after a Dam break

Ferrari, Angela;Fraccarollo, Luigi;Dumbser, Michael;Toro, Eleuterio Francisco;Armanini, Aronne
2010-01-01

Abstract

In this paper, the wave propagation on a plane dry bottom after a dam break is analysed. Two mathematical models have been used and compared with each other for simulating such a dam-break scenario. First, the fully three-dimensional Navier–Stokes equations for a weakly compressible fluid have been solved using the new smooth particle hydrodynamics formulation, recently proposed by Ferrari et al. (Comput. Fluids, vol. 38, 2009, p. 1203). Second, the two-dimensional shallow water equations (SWEs) are solved using a third-order weighted essentially non-oscillatory finitevolume scheme. The numerical results are critically compared against the laboratory measurements provided by Fraccarollo & Toro (J. Hydraul. Res., vol. 33, 1995, p. 843). The experimental data provide the temporal evolution of the pressure field, the water depth and the vertical velocity profile at 40 gauges, located in the reservoir and in front of the gate. Our analysis reveals the shortcomings of SWEs in the initial stages of the dam-break phenomenon in reproducing many important flow features of the unsteady free-surface flow: the shallow water model predicts a complex wave structure and a wavy evolution of local free-surface elevations in the reservoir that can be clearly identified to be only model artefacts. However, the quasi-incompressible Navier–Stokes model reproduces well the high gradients in the flow field and predicts the cycles of simultaneous rapid decreasing and frozen stages of the free surface in the tank along with the velocity oscillations. Asymptotically, i.e. for ‘large times’, the shallow water model and the weakly compressible Navier–Stokes model agree well with the experimental data, since the classical SWE assumptions are satisfied only at large times.
2010
Ferrari, Angela; Fraccarollo, Luigi; Dumbser, Michael; Toro, Eleuterio Francisco; Armanini, Aronne
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11572/85127
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