Recent developments in information technology have brought about important changes in distributed computing. New environments such as massively large-scale, wide-area computer networks and mobile ad hoc networks have emerged. Common characteristics of these environments include extreme dynamicity, unreliability, and large scale. Traditional approaches to designing distributed applications in these environments based on central control, small scale, or strong reliability assumptions are not suitable for exploiting their enormous potential. Based on the observation that living organisms can effectively organize large numbers of unreliable and dynamically-changing components (cells, molecules, individuals, etc.) into robust and adaptive structures, it has long been a research challenge to characterize the key ideas and mechanisms that make biological systems work and to apply them to distributed systems engineering. In this article we propose a conceptual framework that captures several basic biological processes in the form of a family of design patterns. Examples include plain diffusion, replication, chemotaxis, and stigmergy. We show through examples how to implement important functions for distributed computing based on these patterns. Using a common evaluation methodology, we show that our bio-inspired solutions have performance comparable to traditional, state-of-the-art solutions while they inherit desirable properties of biological systems including adaptivity and robustness.

Design Patterns from Biology for Distributed Computing

Montresor, Alberto
2006

Abstract

Recent developments in information technology have brought about important changes in distributed computing. New environments such as massively large-scale, wide-area computer networks and mobile ad hoc networks have emerged. Common characteristics of these environments include extreme dynamicity, unreliability, and large scale. Traditional approaches to designing distributed applications in these environments based on central control, small scale, or strong reliability assumptions are not suitable for exploiting their enormous potential. Based on the observation that living organisms can effectively organize large numbers of unreliable and dynamically-changing components (cells, molecules, individuals, etc.) into robust and adaptive structures, it has long been a research challenge to characterize the key ideas and mechanisms that make biological systems work and to apply them to distributed systems engineering. In this article we propose a conceptual framework that captures several basic biological processes in the form of a family of design patterns. Examples include plain diffusion, replication, chemotaxis, and stigmergy. We show through examples how to implement important functions for distributed computing based on these patterns. Using a common evaluation methodology, we show that our bio-inspired solutions have performance comparable to traditional, state-of-the-art solutions while they inherit desirable properties of biological systems including adaptivity and robustness.
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O., Babaoglu; G., Canright; A., Deutsch; G., Di Caro; F., Ducatelle; L., Gambardella; N., Ganguly; M., Jelasity; R., Montemanni; Montresor, Alberto
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11572/69468
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