As computer networks increase in size, become more heterogeneous and span greater geographic distances, applications must be designed to cope with the very large scale, poor reliability, and often, with the extreme dynamism of the underlying network. Aggregation is a key functional building block for such applications: it refers to a set of functions that provide components of a distributed system access to global information including network size, average load, average uptime, location and description of hotspots, and so on. Local access to global information is often very useful, if not indispensable for building applications that are robust and adaptive. For example, in an industrial control application, some aggregate value reaching a threshold may trigger the execution of certain actions; a distributed storage system will want to know the total available free space; load-balancing protocols may benefit from knowing the target average load so as to minimize the load they transfer. We propose a gossip-based protocol for computing aggregate values over network components in a fully decentralized fashion. The class of aggregate functions we can compute is very broad and includes many useful special cases such as counting, averages, sums, products, and extremal values. The protocol is suitable for extremely large and highly dynamic systems due to its proactive structure---all nodes receive the aggregate value continuously, thus being able to track any changes in the system. The protocol is also extremely lightweight, making it suitable for many distributed applications including peer-to-peer and grid computing systems. We demonstrate the efficiency and robustness of our gossip-based protocol both theoretically and experimentally under a variety of scenarios including node and communication failures.

Gossip-based aggregation in large dynamic networks

Montresor, Alberto;
2005

Abstract

As computer networks increase in size, become more heterogeneous and span greater geographic distances, applications must be designed to cope with the very large scale, poor reliability, and often, with the extreme dynamism of the underlying network. Aggregation is a key functional building block for such applications: it refers to a set of functions that provide components of a distributed system access to global information including network size, average load, average uptime, location and description of hotspots, and so on. Local access to global information is often very useful, if not indispensable for building applications that are robust and adaptive. For example, in an industrial control application, some aggregate value reaching a threshold may trigger the execution of certain actions; a distributed storage system will want to know the total available free space; load-balancing protocols may benefit from knowing the target average load so as to minimize the load they transfer. We propose a gossip-based protocol for computing aggregate values over network components in a fully decentralized fashion. The class of aggregate functions we can compute is very broad and includes many useful special cases such as counting, averages, sums, products, and extremal values. The protocol is suitable for extremely large and highly dynamic systems due to its proactive structure---all nodes receive the aggregate value continuously, thus being able to track any changes in the system. The protocol is also extremely lightweight, making it suitable for many distributed applications including peer-to-peer and grid computing systems. We demonstrate the efficiency and robustness of our gossip-based protocol both theoretically and experimentally under a variety of scenarios including node and communication failures.
1
M., Jelasity; Montresor, Alberto; O., Babaoglu
File in questo prodotto:
Non ci sono file associati a questo prodotto.

I documenti in IRIS sono protetti da copyright e tutti i diritti sono riservati, salvo diversa indicazione

Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11572/69451
Citazioni
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.pmc??? ND
  • Scopus 533
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.isi??? ND
social impact