Background: Managing exercise in type 1 diabetes is challenging, in part, because different types of exercises can have diverging effects on glycemia. The aim of this work was to develop a classification model that can classify an exercise event (structured or unstructured) as aerobic, interval, or resistance for the purpose of incorporation into an automated insulin delivery (AID) system. Methods: A long short-term memory network model was developed with real-world data from 30-min structured sessions of at-home exercise (aerobic, resistance, or mixed) using triaxial accelerometer, heart rate, and activity duration information. The detection algorithm was used to classify 15 common free-living and unstructured activities and relate each to exercise-associated change in glucose. Results: A total of 1610 structured exercise sessions were used to train, validate, and test the model. The accuracy for the structured exercise sessions in the testing set was 72% for aerobic, 65% for interval, and 77% for resistance. In addition, we tested the classifier on 3328 unstructured sessions. We validated the session-associated change in glucose against the expected change during exercise for each type. Mean and standard deviation of the change in glucose of -20.8 (40.3) mg/dL were achieved for sessions classified as aerobic, -16.2 (39.0) mg/dL for sessions classified as interval, and -11.6 (38.8) mg/dL for sessions classified as resistance. Conclusions: The proposed algorithm reliably identified physical activity associated with expected change in glucose, which could be integrated into an AID system to manage the exercise disturbance in glycemia according to the predicted class.

Online Classification of Unstructured Free-Living Exercise Sessions in People with Type 1 Diabetes / Fushimi, E.; Aiello, E. M.; Cho, S.; Riddell, M. C.; Gal, R. L.; Martin, C. K.; Patton, S. R.; Rickels, M. R.; Doyle, F. J.. - In: DIABETES TECHNOLOGY & THERAPEUTICS. - ISSN 1557-8593. - 2024:(2024). [10.1089/dia.2023.0528]

Online Classification of Unstructured Free-Living Exercise Sessions in People with Type 1 Diabetes

Aiello E. M.
Co-primo
;
2024-01-01

Abstract

Background: Managing exercise in type 1 diabetes is challenging, in part, because different types of exercises can have diverging effects on glycemia. The aim of this work was to develop a classification model that can classify an exercise event (structured or unstructured) as aerobic, interval, or resistance for the purpose of incorporation into an automated insulin delivery (AID) system. Methods: A long short-term memory network model was developed with real-world data from 30-min structured sessions of at-home exercise (aerobic, resistance, or mixed) using triaxial accelerometer, heart rate, and activity duration information. The detection algorithm was used to classify 15 common free-living and unstructured activities and relate each to exercise-associated change in glucose. Results: A total of 1610 structured exercise sessions were used to train, validate, and test the model. The accuracy for the structured exercise sessions in the testing set was 72% for aerobic, 65% for interval, and 77% for resistance. In addition, we tested the classifier on 3328 unstructured sessions. We validated the session-associated change in glucose against the expected change during exercise for each type. Mean and standard deviation of the change in glucose of -20.8 (40.3) mg/dL were achieved for sessions classified as aerobic, -16.2 (39.0) mg/dL for sessions classified as interval, and -11.6 (38.8) mg/dL for sessions classified as resistance. Conclusions: The proposed algorithm reliably identified physical activity associated with expected change in glucose, which could be integrated into an AID system to manage the exercise disturbance in glycemia according to the predicted class.
2024
Fushimi, E.; Aiello, E. M.; Cho, S.; Riddell, M. C.; Gal, R. L.; Martin, C. K.; Patton, S. R.; Rickels, M. R.; Doyle, F. J.
Online Classification of Unstructured Free-Living Exercise Sessions in People with Type 1 Diabetes / Fushimi, E.; Aiello, E. M.; Cho, S.; Riddell, M. C.; Gal, R. L.; Martin, C. K.; Patton, S. R.; Rickels, M. R.; Doyle, F. J.. - In: DIABETES TECHNOLOGY & THERAPEUTICS. - ISSN 1557-8593. - 2024:(2024). [10.1089/dia.2023.0528]
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11572/413178
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