Background During Pressure Support Ventilation (PSV) an inspiratory hold allows to measure plateau pressure (Pplat), driving pressure (∆P), respiratory system compliance (Crs) and pressure-muscle-index (PMI), an index of inspira‑ tory efort. This study aims [1] to assess systematically how patient’s efort (estimated with PMI), ∆P and tidal volume (Vt) change in response to variations in PSV and [2] to confrm the robustness of Crs measurement during PSV. Methods 18 patients recovering from acute respiratory failure and ventilated by PSV were cross-randomized to four steps of assistance above (+3 and+6 cmH2O) and below (-3 and -6 cmH2O) clinically set PS. Inspiratory and expiratory holds were performed to measure Pplat, PMI, ∆P, Vt, Crs, P0.1 and occluded inspiratory airway pressure (Pocc). Electro‑ myography of respiratory muscles was monitored noninvasively from body surface (sEMG). Results As PSV was decreased, Pplat (from 20.5±3.3 cmH2O to 16.7±2.9, P<0.001) and ∆P (from 12.5±2.3 to 8.6±2.3 cmH2O, P<0.001) decreased much less than peak airway pressure did (from 21.7±3.8 to 9.7±3.8 cmH2O, P<0.001), given the progressive increase of patient’s efort (PMI from -1.2±2.3 to 6.4±3.2 cmH2O) in line with sEMG of the dia‑ phragm (r=0.614; P<0.001). As ∆P increased linearly with Vt, Crs did not change through steps (P=0.119). Conclusion Patients react to a decrease in PSV by increasing inspiratory efort—as estimated by PMI—keeping Vt and ∆P on a desired value, therefore, limiting the clinician’s ability to modulate them. PMI appears a valuable index to assess the point of ventilatory overassistance when patients lose control over Vt like in a pressure-control mode. The measurement of Crs in PSV is constant—likely suggesting reliability—independently from the level of assistance and patient’s efort.

Individual response in patient’s effort and driving pressure to variations in assistance during pressure support ventilation / Docci, Mattia; Rezoagli, Emanuele; Teggia-Droghi, Maddalena; Coppadoro, Andrea; Pozzi, Matteo; Grassi, Alice; Bianchi, Isabella; Foti, Giuseppe; Bellani, Giacomo. - In: ANNALS OF INTENSIVE CARE. - ISSN 2110-5820. - 13:1(2023), pp. 1321-1329. [10.1186/s13613-023-01231-9]

Individual response in patient’s effort and driving pressure to variations in assistance during pressure support ventilation

Bellani, Giacomo
Ultimo
2023-01-01

Abstract

Background During Pressure Support Ventilation (PSV) an inspiratory hold allows to measure plateau pressure (Pplat), driving pressure (∆P), respiratory system compliance (Crs) and pressure-muscle-index (PMI), an index of inspira‑ tory efort. This study aims [1] to assess systematically how patient’s efort (estimated with PMI), ∆P and tidal volume (Vt) change in response to variations in PSV and [2] to confrm the robustness of Crs measurement during PSV. Methods 18 patients recovering from acute respiratory failure and ventilated by PSV were cross-randomized to four steps of assistance above (+3 and+6 cmH2O) and below (-3 and -6 cmH2O) clinically set PS. Inspiratory and expiratory holds were performed to measure Pplat, PMI, ∆P, Vt, Crs, P0.1 and occluded inspiratory airway pressure (Pocc). Electro‑ myography of respiratory muscles was monitored noninvasively from body surface (sEMG). Results As PSV was decreased, Pplat (from 20.5±3.3 cmH2O to 16.7±2.9, P<0.001) and ∆P (from 12.5±2.3 to 8.6±2.3 cmH2O, P<0.001) decreased much less than peak airway pressure did (from 21.7±3.8 to 9.7±3.8 cmH2O, P<0.001), given the progressive increase of patient’s efort (PMI from -1.2±2.3 to 6.4±3.2 cmH2O) in line with sEMG of the dia‑ phragm (r=0.614; P<0.001). As ∆P increased linearly with Vt, Crs did not change through steps (P=0.119). Conclusion Patients react to a decrease in PSV by increasing inspiratory efort—as estimated by PMI—keeping Vt and ∆P on a desired value, therefore, limiting the clinician’s ability to modulate them. PMI appears a valuable index to assess the point of ventilatory overassistance when patients lose control over Vt like in a pressure-control mode. The measurement of Crs in PSV is constant—likely suggesting reliability—independently from the level of assistance and patient’s efort.
2023
1
Docci, Mattia; Rezoagli, Emanuele; Teggia-Droghi, Maddalena; Coppadoro, Andrea; Pozzi, Matteo; Grassi, Alice; Bianchi, Isabella; Foti, Giuseppe; Bellani, Giacomo
Individual response in patient’s effort and driving pressure to variations in assistance during pressure support ventilation / Docci, Mattia; Rezoagli, Emanuele; Teggia-Droghi, Maddalena; Coppadoro, Andrea; Pozzi, Matteo; Grassi, Alice; Bianchi, Isabella; Foti, Giuseppe; Bellani, Giacomo. - In: ANNALS OF INTENSIVE CARE. - ISSN 2110-5820. - 13:1(2023), pp. 1321-1329. [10.1186/s13613-023-01231-9]
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11572/411857
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