The severity of the phenomenon of forced labour, among other forms of human exploitation, has garnered paramount significance in the context of contemporary socioeconomic changes. For this reason, the present work seeks to address the issue through the lens of international law with two primary objectives. Firstly, to delineate the actual legal status surrounding the prohibition of forced labour and secondly, to clarify the nature of State responsibility for the utilisation of forced labour by private actors. Built upon this foundation, the research unfolds in a tripartite structure. The first chapter is introduced by an historical overview focused on States’ acknowledgement of forced labour alongside abolitionist movements against slavery between the XIX and XX centuries. The overview serves as a basis for an in-depth examination of relevant key international agreements drafted within the League of Nations and later the United Nations, as well as the International Labour Organization, up to the latest developments. The analysis then extends to forced labour provisions enshrined in regional human rights conventions and other pertinent international agreements as well as to the most recent contribution developed within practice of international organisations. The second chapter is divided into two sections. In the first part, the focus lies on the case law on the prohibition of forced labour as interpreted by the International Court of Justice and regional human rights courts. In the subsequent part, examples of national legislation aimed at combating forced labour through corporate accountability are outlined, alongside supranational initiatives aligned with this overarching objective. Drawing from the insights garnered in the preceding chapters, the concluding chapter presents an exploration of the status of the prohibition of forced labour within the framework of international law. This is followed by the analysis of three potential hypotheses aimed at elucidating the nature of State responsibility regarding the employment of forced labour by private actors. On these grounds, the prominence of forced labour in contemporary international law and the critical role of States in addressing it is ultimately unveiled. The outcomes of the work assess if States’ strategies align with the urgency of the issue, suggesting future approaches to effectively tackle forced labour in the actual global landscape.

Forced Labour in International Law and Responsibility of States for Private Actors / Tulli, Filomena Medea. - (2024 Jun 14), pp. 1-365.

Forced Labour in International Law and Responsibility of States for Private Actors

Tulli, Filomena Medea
2024-06-14

Abstract

The severity of the phenomenon of forced labour, among other forms of human exploitation, has garnered paramount significance in the context of contemporary socioeconomic changes. For this reason, the present work seeks to address the issue through the lens of international law with two primary objectives. Firstly, to delineate the actual legal status surrounding the prohibition of forced labour and secondly, to clarify the nature of State responsibility for the utilisation of forced labour by private actors. Built upon this foundation, the research unfolds in a tripartite structure. The first chapter is introduced by an historical overview focused on States’ acknowledgement of forced labour alongside abolitionist movements against slavery between the XIX and XX centuries. The overview serves as a basis for an in-depth examination of relevant key international agreements drafted within the League of Nations and later the United Nations, as well as the International Labour Organization, up to the latest developments. The analysis then extends to forced labour provisions enshrined in regional human rights conventions and other pertinent international agreements as well as to the most recent contribution developed within practice of international organisations. The second chapter is divided into two sections. In the first part, the focus lies on the case law on the prohibition of forced labour as interpreted by the International Court of Justice and regional human rights courts. In the subsequent part, examples of national legislation aimed at combating forced labour through corporate accountability are outlined, alongside supranational initiatives aligned with this overarching objective. Drawing from the insights garnered in the preceding chapters, the concluding chapter presents an exploration of the status of the prohibition of forced labour within the framework of international law. This is followed by the analysis of three potential hypotheses aimed at elucidating the nature of State responsibility regarding the employment of forced labour by private actors. On these grounds, the prominence of forced labour in contemporary international law and the critical role of States in addressing it is ultimately unveiled. The outcomes of the work assess if States’ strategies align with the urgency of the issue, suggesting future approaches to effectively tackle forced labour in the actual global landscape.
14-giu-2024
XXXVI
2023-2024
Facoltà di Giurisprudenza (29/10/12-)
Comparative and European Legal Studies
Nesi, Giuseppe
Walter, Christian
GERMANIA
Inglese
Settore IUS/13 - Diritto Internazionale
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Descrizione: Forced Labour in International Law and Responsibility of States for Private Actors
Tipologia: Tesi di dottorato (Doctoral Thesis)
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11572/410471
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