Modern neuroscience agrees that neurological processing emerges from the multimodal interaction among multiple cortical and subcortical neuronal hubs, connected at short and long distance by white matter, to form a largely integrated and dynamic network, called the brain "connectome." The final architecture of these circuits results from a complex, continuous, and highly protracted development process of several axonal pathways that constitute the anatomical substrate of neuronal interactions. Awareness of the network organization of the central nervous system is crucial not only to understand the basis of children's neurological development, but also it may be of special interest to improve the quality of neurosurgical treatments of many pediatric diseases. Although there are a flourishing number of neuroimaging studies of the connectome, a comprehensive vision linking this research to neurosurgical practice is still lacking in the current pediatric literature. The goal of this review is to contribute to bridging this gap. In the first part, we summarize the main current knowledge concerning brain network maturation and its involvement in different aspects of normal neurocognitive development as well as in the pathophysiology of specific diseases. The final section is devoted to identifying possible implications of this knowledge in the neurosurgical field, especially in epilepsy and tumor surgery, and to discuss promising perspectives for future investigations.

Structural networking of the developing brain: from maturation to neurosurgical implications / De Benedictis, Alessandro; Rossi-Espagnet, Maria Camilla; de Palma, Luca; Sarubbo, Silvio; Marras, Carlo Efisio. - In: FRONTIERS IN NEUROANATOMY. - ISSN 1662-5129. - 17:(2023), pp. 1-23. [10.3389/fnana.2023.1242757]

Structural networking of the developing brain: from maturation to neurosurgical implications

Sarubbo, Silvio;
2023-01-01

Abstract

Modern neuroscience agrees that neurological processing emerges from the multimodal interaction among multiple cortical and subcortical neuronal hubs, connected at short and long distance by white matter, to form a largely integrated and dynamic network, called the brain "connectome." The final architecture of these circuits results from a complex, continuous, and highly protracted development process of several axonal pathways that constitute the anatomical substrate of neuronal interactions. Awareness of the network organization of the central nervous system is crucial not only to understand the basis of children's neurological development, but also it may be of special interest to improve the quality of neurosurgical treatments of many pediatric diseases. Although there are a flourishing number of neuroimaging studies of the connectome, a comprehensive vision linking this research to neurosurgical practice is still lacking in the current pediatric literature. The goal of this review is to contribute to bridging this gap. In the first part, we summarize the main current knowledge concerning brain network maturation and its involvement in different aspects of normal neurocognitive development as well as in the pathophysiology of specific diseases. The final section is devoted to identifying possible implications of this knowledge in the neurosurgical field, especially in epilepsy and tumor surgery, and to discuss promising perspectives for future investigations.
2023
De Benedictis, Alessandro; Rossi-Espagnet, Maria Camilla; de Palma, Luca; Sarubbo, Silvio; Marras, Carlo Efisio
Structural networking of the developing brain: from maturation to neurosurgical implications / De Benedictis, Alessandro; Rossi-Espagnet, Maria Camilla; de Palma, Luca; Sarubbo, Silvio; Marras, Carlo Efisio. - In: FRONTIERS IN NEUROANATOMY. - ISSN 1662-5129. - 17:(2023), pp. 1-23. [10.3389/fnana.2023.1242757]
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11572/404970
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