Surfaces capable of delaying the frosting passively and facilitating its removal are highly desirable in fields where ice introduces inefficiencies and risks. Coalescence-induced condensation droplets jumping (CICDJ), enabled on highly hydrophobic surfaces, is already exploited to slow down the frosting but it is insufficient to completely eliminate the propagation by ice-bridging. The study shows here how the self-ejection of single condensation droplets can fully frustrate all the ice bridges, resulting in a frost velocity lower than 0.5 μm s−1 and thus falling below the current limits of passive surfaces. Arrays of truncated microcones, covered by uniformly hydrophobic nanostructures, enable individual condensation droplets to grow and self-propel toward the top of the microstructures and then to self-eject once a precise volume is reached. The independency of self-ejection on the neighbor droplets allows a fine control of the droplets size and distance distributions and thus the ice-bridging frustration. The truncated microcones with the smallest heads area fraction maximize the percentage of self-ejecting droplets and minimize the frost velocity. The ice bridges frustration also implies a small frost area coverage, highly desirable in aeronautics and thermal machines.

Ice‐Bridging Frustration by Self‐Ejection of Single Droplets Results in Superior Anti‐Frosting Surfaces / Di Novo, Nicolò G.; Bagolini, Alvise; Pugno, Nicola M.. - In: ADVANCED MATERIALS INTERFACES. - ISSN 2196-7350. - 2024:2300759(2024), pp. 1-14. [10.1002/admi.202300759]

Ice‐Bridging Frustration by Self‐Ejection of Single Droplets Results in Superior Anti‐Frosting Surfaces

Pugno, Nicola M.
Ultimo
2024-01-01

Abstract

Surfaces capable of delaying the frosting passively and facilitating its removal are highly desirable in fields where ice introduces inefficiencies and risks. Coalescence-induced condensation droplets jumping (CICDJ), enabled on highly hydrophobic surfaces, is already exploited to slow down the frosting but it is insufficient to completely eliminate the propagation by ice-bridging. The study shows here how the self-ejection of single condensation droplets can fully frustrate all the ice bridges, resulting in a frost velocity lower than 0.5 μm s−1 and thus falling below the current limits of passive surfaces. Arrays of truncated microcones, covered by uniformly hydrophobic nanostructures, enable individual condensation droplets to grow and self-propel toward the top of the microstructures and then to self-eject once a precise volume is reached. The independency of self-ejection on the neighbor droplets allows a fine control of the droplets size and distance distributions and thus the ice-bridging frustration. The truncated microcones with the smallest heads area fraction maximize the percentage of self-ejecting droplets and minimize the frost velocity. The ice bridges frustration also implies a small frost area coverage, highly desirable in aeronautics and thermal machines.
2024
2300759
Di Novo, Nicolò G.; Bagolini, Alvise; Pugno, Nicola M.
Ice‐Bridging Frustration by Self‐Ejection of Single Droplets Results in Superior Anti‐Frosting Surfaces / Di Novo, Nicolò G.; Bagolini, Alvise; Pugno, Nicola M.. - In: ADVANCED MATERIALS INTERFACES. - ISSN 2196-7350. - 2024:2300759(2024), pp. 1-14. [10.1002/admi.202300759]
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11572/400751
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