Smartphones are essential tools for communications and information management in organizational settings. However, smartphone use is a risky behavior when used while driving to and from work. As work experiences have been found to influence risky commuting behaviors, we hypothesized that job crafting, i.e., a set of proactive work behaviors through which employees change their job demands and resources, influences and is influenced by risky commuting behaviors. We argued that employees' smartphone use during driving commutes is related to how employees proactively choose to transform their demands and resources at work. A quantitative diary study was designed to investigate the process linking smartphone use during driving commutes to and from work and job crafting. A sample of 128 office employees completed two short daily questionnaires for five consecutive workdays (N = 627 observations). Results from multilevel analyses showed that daily talking on the phone while driving to work was positively associated with the proactive optimization of job demands, while daily proactive pursuing of challenging stimuli at work (i.e., seeking challenges) was positively related to looking at the phone when employees drove back from work. Furthermore, on days when employees reduced their hindering job demands, they reported less frequent talking on the phone while driving back from work. Results provide practical implications for the prevention of distracted driving and other risky driving behaviors.

Eyes on the road, hands upon the wheel? Reciprocal dynamics between smartphone use while driving and job crafting / Costantini, Arianna; Ceschi, Andrea; Oviedo-Trespalacios, Oscar. - In: TRANSPORTATION RESEARCH PART F: TRAFFIC PSYCHOLOGY AND BEHAVIOUR. - ISSN 1369-8478. - 89:(2022), pp. 129-142. [10.1016/j.trf.2022.05.020]

Eyes on the road, hands upon the wheel? Reciprocal dynamics between smartphone use while driving and job crafting

Costantini, Arianna;
2022

Abstract

Smartphones are essential tools for communications and information management in organizational settings. However, smartphone use is a risky behavior when used while driving to and from work. As work experiences have been found to influence risky commuting behaviors, we hypothesized that job crafting, i.e., a set of proactive work behaviors through which employees change their job demands and resources, influences and is influenced by risky commuting behaviors. We argued that employees' smartphone use during driving commutes is related to how employees proactively choose to transform their demands and resources at work. A quantitative diary study was designed to investigate the process linking smartphone use during driving commutes to and from work and job crafting. A sample of 128 office employees completed two short daily questionnaires for five consecutive workdays (N = 627 observations). Results from multilevel analyses showed that daily talking on the phone while driving to work was positively associated with the proactive optimization of job demands, while daily proactive pursuing of challenging stimuli at work (i.e., seeking challenges) was positively related to looking at the phone when employees drove back from work. Furthermore, on days when employees reduced their hindering job demands, they reported less frequent talking on the phone while driving back from work. Results provide practical implications for the prevention of distracted driving and other risky driving behaviors.
Costantini, Arianna; Ceschi, Andrea; Oviedo-Trespalacios, Oscar
Eyes on the road, hands upon the wheel? Reciprocal dynamics between smartphone use while driving and job crafting / Costantini, Arianna; Ceschi, Andrea; Oviedo-Trespalacios, Oscar. - In: TRANSPORTATION RESEARCH PART F: TRAFFIC PSYCHOLOGY AND BEHAVIOUR. - ISSN 1369-8478. - 89:(2022), pp. 129-142. [10.1016/j.trf.2022.05.020]
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11572/348139
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