Despite a huge advancement in neuroimaging techniques and growing importance of inter-personal brain research, few studies assess the most appropriate computational methods to measure brain-brain coupling. Here, we focus on the signal processing methods to detect brain-coupling in dyads. From a public dataset of functional Near Infra-Red Spectroscopy signals (N=24 dyads), we derived a synthetic control condition by randomization, we investigated the effectiveness of four most used signal similarity metrics: Cross Correlation, Mutual Information, Wavelet Coherence and Dynamic Time Warping. We also accounted for temporal variations between signals by allowing for misalignments up to a maximum lag. Starting from the observed effect sizes, computed in terms of Cohen’s d, the power analysis indicated that a high sample size (N> 150) would be required to detect significant brain-coupling. We therefore discuss the need for specialized statistical approaches and propose bootstrap as an alternative method to avoid over-penalizing the results. In our settings, and based on bootstrap analyses, Cross Correlation and Dynamic Time Warping outperform Mutual Information and Wavelet Coherence for all considered maximum lags, with reproducible results. These results highlight the need to set specific guidelines as the high degree of customization of the signal processing procedures prevents the comparability between studies, their reproducibility and, ultimately, undermines the possibility of extracting new knowledge.

Reproducible Inter-Personal Brain Coupling Measurements in Hyperscanning Settings With functional Near Infra-Red Spectroscopy / Bizzego, A.; Azhari, A.; Esposito, G.. - In: NEUROINFORMATICS. - ISSN 1539-2791. - 2021:(2021), pp. 1-11. [10.1007/s12021-021-09551-6]

Reproducible Inter-Personal Brain Coupling Measurements in Hyperscanning Settings With functional Near Infra-Red Spectroscopy

Bizzego A.;Esposito G.
2021-01-01

Abstract

Despite a huge advancement in neuroimaging techniques and growing importance of inter-personal brain research, few studies assess the most appropriate computational methods to measure brain-brain coupling. Here, we focus on the signal processing methods to detect brain-coupling in dyads. From a public dataset of functional Near Infra-Red Spectroscopy signals (N=24 dyads), we derived a synthetic control condition by randomization, we investigated the effectiveness of four most used signal similarity metrics: Cross Correlation, Mutual Information, Wavelet Coherence and Dynamic Time Warping. We also accounted for temporal variations between signals by allowing for misalignments up to a maximum lag. Starting from the observed effect sizes, computed in terms of Cohen’s d, the power analysis indicated that a high sample size (N> 150) would be required to detect significant brain-coupling. We therefore discuss the need for specialized statistical approaches and propose bootstrap as an alternative method to avoid over-penalizing the results. In our settings, and based on bootstrap analyses, Cross Correlation and Dynamic Time Warping outperform Mutual Information and Wavelet Coherence for all considered maximum lags, with reproducible results. These results highlight the need to set specific guidelines as the high degree of customization of the signal processing procedures prevents the comparability between studies, their reproducibility and, ultimately, undermines the possibility of extracting new knowledge.
2021
Bizzego, A.; Azhari, A.; Esposito, G.
Reproducible Inter-Personal Brain Coupling Measurements in Hyperscanning Settings With functional Near Infra-Red Spectroscopy / Bizzego, A.; Azhari, A.; Esposito, G.. - In: NEUROINFORMATICS. - ISSN 1539-2791. - 2021:(2021), pp. 1-11. [10.1007/s12021-021-09551-6]
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11572/329775
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