Previous work from our laboratory in the mdx mouse model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) demonstrated that a fraction of muscle stem cells (i.e., satellite cells) (MuSCs) progressively lose the expression of myogenic markers during the progression of the disease. In the process of characterizing this aberrant behaviour, we serendipitously discovered that MuSCs might be separated into two distinct subpopulations based on the expression of the GPI-anchored surface protein CD90. Crucially, this separation does not correlate with a divergence from the myogenic lineage; instead, it separates the pool of MuSCs into two subpopulations, both maintaining myogenic properties in healthy muscles. These two newly identified subpopulations do not overlap with any previously reported subpopulation and may be prospectively isolated; present a different response in terms of kinetics of activation and differentiation during the regenerative process induced by acute muscle damage; show a different propensity to enter in GAlert state upon distal injury; display dissimilar pAMPK activity and contain a different amount of mitochondria; are present in different proportions in distinct muscle groups; differentially express ECM encoding genes during quiescence. Moreover, one of the two subpopulations can give rise to the other and therefore appears to be upstream in the lineage hierarchy. Notably, loss of function experiments, in which CD90 was downregulated in MuSCs, diminish the difference in activation displayed by the two subpopulations. This demonstrates that CD90 is a molecular determinant of MuSCs functional diversification. Importantly, although the two subpopulations of MuSCs are numerically similar in healthy limb muscles, one of the two subpopulations is lost with time in dystrophic mdx mice. Based on these data, we are hypothesizing that an imbalance between the two newly identified subpopulations may impair regeneration in the dystrophic muscles. These observations not only increase our knowledge of the molecular and cellular dynamics that are controlling normal and pathological muscle homeostasis but also open the possibility that restoring the proper functional equilibrium between subpopulations of MuSCs may counteract the progression of the dystrophic disease.

CD90 marks satellite cells into two subpopulations with distinct dynamics of activation and proliferation / Libergoli, Michela. - (2021 Nov 25), pp. 1-138. [10.15168/11572_323156]

CD90 marks satellite cells into two subpopulations with distinct dynamics of activation and proliferation

Libergoli, Michela
2021-11-25

Abstract

Previous work from our laboratory in the mdx mouse model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) demonstrated that a fraction of muscle stem cells (i.e., satellite cells) (MuSCs) progressively lose the expression of myogenic markers during the progression of the disease. In the process of characterizing this aberrant behaviour, we serendipitously discovered that MuSCs might be separated into two distinct subpopulations based on the expression of the GPI-anchored surface protein CD90. Crucially, this separation does not correlate with a divergence from the myogenic lineage; instead, it separates the pool of MuSCs into two subpopulations, both maintaining myogenic properties in healthy muscles. These two newly identified subpopulations do not overlap with any previously reported subpopulation and may be prospectively isolated; present a different response in terms of kinetics of activation and differentiation during the regenerative process induced by acute muscle damage; show a different propensity to enter in GAlert state upon distal injury; display dissimilar pAMPK activity and contain a different amount of mitochondria; are present in different proportions in distinct muscle groups; differentially express ECM encoding genes during quiescence. Moreover, one of the two subpopulations can give rise to the other and therefore appears to be upstream in the lineage hierarchy. Notably, loss of function experiments, in which CD90 was downregulated in MuSCs, diminish the difference in activation displayed by the two subpopulations. This demonstrates that CD90 is a molecular determinant of MuSCs functional diversification. Importantly, although the two subpopulations of MuSCs are numerically similar in healthy limb muscles, one of the two subpopulations is lost with time in dystrophic mdx mice. Based on these data, we are hypothesizing that an imbalance between the two newly identified subpopulations may impair regeneration in the dystrophic muscles. These observations not only increase our knowledge of the molecular and cellular dynamics that are controlling normal and pathological muscle homeostasis but also open the possibility that restoring the proper functional equilibrium between subpopulations of MuSCs may counteract the progression of the dystrophic disease.
XXXIII
2019-2020
CIBIO (29/10/12-)
Biomolecular Sciences
Conti, Luciano
Biressi, Stefano Augusto Maria
no
Inglese
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11572/323156
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