The bacterial symbiont Wolbachia can protect insects against viral pathogens, and the varying levels of antiviral protection are correlated with the endosymbiont load within the insects. To understand why Wolbachia strains differ in their antiviral effects, we investigated the factors controlling Wolbachia density in five closely related strains in their natural Drosophila hosts. We found that Wolbachia density varied greatly across different tissues and between flies of different ages, and these effects depended on the host–symbiont association. Some endosymbionts maintained largely stable densities as flies aged while others increased, and these effects in turn depended on the tissue being examined. Measuring Wolbachia rRNA levels in response to viral infection, we found that viral infection itself also altered Wolbachia levels, with Flock House virus causing substantial reductions in symbiont loads late in the infection. This effect, however, was virus-specific as Drosophila C virus had little impact on Wolbachia in all of the five host systems. Because viruses have strong tissue tropisms and antiviral protection is thought to be cell-autonomous, these effects are likely to affect the virus-blocking phenomenon. However, we were unable to find any evidence of a correlation between Wolbachia and viral titres within the same tissues. We conclude that Wolbachia levels within flies are regulated in a complex host–symbiont–virus-dependent manner and this trinity is likely to influence the antiviral effects of Wolbachia.

Age, tissue, genotype and virus infection regulate Wolbachia levels in Drosophila / Kaur, R.; Martinez, J.; Rota Stabelli, O.; Jiggins, F. M.; Miller, W. J.. - In: MOLECULAR ECOLOGY. - ISSN 0962-1083. - 29:11(2020), pp. 2063-2079. [10.1111/mec.15462]

Age, tissue, genotype and virus infection regulate Wolbachia levels in Drosophila

Rota Stabelli O.;
2020-01-01

Abstract

The bacterial symbiont Wolbachia can protect insects against viral pathogens, and the varying levels of antiviral protection are correlated with the endosymbiont load within the insects. To understand why Wolbachia strains differ in their antiviral effects, we investigated the factors controlling Wolbachia density in five closely related strains in their natural Drosophila hosts. We found that Wolbachia density varied greatly across different tissues and between flies of different ages, and these effects depended on the host–symbiont association. Some endosymbionts maintained largely stable densities as flies aged while others increased, and these effects in turn depended on the tissue being examined. Measuring Wolbachia rRNA levels in response to viral infection, we found that viral infection itself also altered Wolbachia levels, with Flock House virus causing substantial reductions in symbiont loads late in the infection. This effect, however, was virus-specific as Drosophila C virus had little impact on Wolbachia in all of the five host systems. Because viruses have strong tissue tropisms and antiviral protection is thought to be cell-autonomous, these effects are likely to affect the virus-blocking phenomenon. However, we were unable to find any evidence of a correlation between Wolbachia and viral titres within the same tissues. We conclude that Wolbachia levels within flies are regulated in a complex host–symbiont–virus-dependent manner and this trinity is likely to influence the antiviral effects of Wolbachia.
2020
11
Kaur, R.; Martinez, J.; Rota Stabelli, O.; Jiggins, F. M.; Miller, W. J.
Age, tissue, genotype and virus infection regulate Wolbachia levels in Drosophila / Kaur, R.; Martinez, J.; Rota Stabelli, O.; Jiggins, F. M.; Miller, W. J.. - In: MOLECULAR ECOLOGY. - ISSN 0962-1083. - 29:11(2020), pp. 2063-2079. [10.1111/mec.15462]
File in questo prodotto:
File Dimensione Formato  
2020_Kaur_Wolbachia_MolEcol.pdf

Solo gestori archivio

Tipologia: Versione editoriale (Publisher’s layout)
Licenza: Tutti i diritti riservati (All rights reserved)
Dimensione 2.06 MB
Formato Adobe PDF
2.06 MB Adobe PDF   Visualizza/Apri

I documenti in IRIS sono protetti da copyright e tutti i diritti sono riservati, salvo diversa indicazione

Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11572/302893
Citazioni
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.pmc??? 15
  • Scopus 17
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.isi??? 16
social impact