West Nile Virus (WNV) is now endemic in many European countries, causing hundreds of human cases every year, with a high spatial and temporal heterogeneity. Previous studies have suggested that spring temperature might play a key role at shaping WNV transmission. Specifically, warmer temperatures in April-May might amplify WNV circulation, thus increasing the risk for human transmission later in the year. To test this hypothesis, we collated publicly available data on the number of human infections recorded in Europe between 2011 and 2019. We then applied generalized linear models to quantify the relationship between human cases and spring temperature, considering both average conditions (over years 2003-2010) and deviations from the average for subsequent years (2011-2019). We found a significant positive association both spatial (average conditions) and temporal (deviations). The former indicates that WNV circulation is higher in usually warmer regions while the latter implies a predictive value of spring conditions over the coming season. We also found a positive association with WNV detection during the previous year, which can be interpreted as an indication of the reliability of the surveillance system but also of WNV overwintering capacity. Weather anomalies at the beginning of the mosquito breeding season might act as an early warning signal for public health authorities, enabling them to strengthen in advance ongoing surveillance and prevention strategies.

Spring temperature shapes West Nile virus transmission in Europe / Marini, Giovanni; Manica, Mattia; Delucchi, Luca; Pugliese, Andrea; Rosà, Roberto. - In: ACTA TROPICA. - ISSN 0001-706X. - 215:(2021), pp. 105796.1-105796.6. [10.1016/j.actatropica.2020.105796]

Spring temperature shapes West Nile virus transmission in Europe

Pugliese, Andrea;Rosà, Roberto
2021-01-01

Abstract

West Nile Virus (WNV) is now endemic in many European countries, causing hundreds of human cases every year, with a high spatial and temporal heterogeneity. Previous studies have suggested that spring temperature might play a key role at shaping WNV transmission. Specifically, warmer temperatures in April-May might amplify WNV circulation, thus increasing the risk for human transmission later in the year. To test this hypothesis, we collated publicly available data on the number of human infections recorded in Europe between 2011 and 2019. We then applied generalized linear models to quantify the relationship between human cases and spring temperature, considering both average conditions (over years 2003-2010) and deviations from the average for subsequent years (2011-2019). We found a significant positive association both spatial (average conditions) and temporal (deviations). The former indicates that WNV circulation is higher in usually warmer regions while the latter implies a predictive value of spring conditions over the coming season. We also found a positive association with WNV detection during the previous year, which can be interpreted as an indication of the reliability of the surveillance system but also of WNV overwintering capacity. Weather anomalies at the beginning of the mosquito breeding season might act as an early warning signal for public health authorities, enabling them to strengthen in advance ongoing surveillance and prevention strategies.
2021
Marini, Giovanni; Manica, Mattia; Delucchi, Luca; Pugliese, Andrea; Rosà, Roberto
Spring temperature shapes West Nile virus transmission in Europe / Marini, Giovanni; Manica, Mattia; Delucchi, Luca; Pugliese, Andrea; Rosà, Roberto. - In: ACTA TROPICA. - ISSN 0001-706X. - 215:(2021), pp. 105796.1-105796.6. [10.1016/j.actatropica.2020.105796]
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11572/287569
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