The mechanical performance of reinforced composites is strongly influenced at different scales by the stress transferred at the matrix-fibre interfaces and at any surface where material discontinuity occurs. In particular, the mechanical response of elastomeric composites where the reinforcement is composed by cords with helically wound fibres is heavily compromised by fatigue and delamination phenomena occurring at cord-rubber as well as at the ply interfaces, since rubber and polymeric matrices are mainly vulnerable to the accumulation of deviatoric energy due to the shear stresses transferred across the surfaces. Despite the large diffusion of composites in a vast field of applications and the mature knowledge of their behaviour, some key mechanical aspects underlying failure mechanisms are still partially unclear. For example, stress amplification and strain localization are often difficult to predict by means of analytical solutions and averaging techniques that usually conceal stress gradients. In this work, we analyse coupling between torsional and tensile loads in twisted cords, which are adopted in many cases to reinforce composites and rubbers in tire applications. We provide a model characterized by an enriched cord-matrix mechanical interplay able to theoretically explain and predict actual stress distributions responsible for the onset of delamination and fatigue-guided phenomena that are experimentally observed in these composites. In particular, we demonstrate that the assumption of a monoclinic/trigonal behaviour for the mechanical response of the hierarchical strands allows to estimate, by means of analytical formulas and a homogenization approach, hitherto neglected shear stresses at the matrix-reinforcement interface. These stresses are transferred to the neighbouring regions, leading to post-elastic behaviour and failure events. Finite Element simulation results for rubber/cord composites under various boundary conditions highlight the discrepancies in mechanical behaviour between the proposed model and standard approaches in the literature, while experimental tests performed on composite rubber pads confirm theoretical predictions, providing qualitative evidence of the onset of cracks.

Unveiling a new shear stress transfer mechanism in composites with helically wound hierarchical fibres / Cutolo, A.; Carotenuto, A. R.; Palumbo, S.; Bosia, F.; Pugno, N. M.; Fraldi, M.. - In: INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF MECHANICAL SCIENCES. - ISSN 0020-7403. - 192:(2021), pp. 106135.1-106135.23. [10.1016/j.ijmecsci.2020.106135]

Unveiling a new shear stress transfer mechanism in composites with helically wound hierarchical fibres

Pugno N. M.;
2021

Abstract

The mechanical performance of reinforced composites is strongly influenced at different scales by the stress transferred at the matrix-fibre interfaces and at any surface where material discontinuity occurs. In particular, the mechanical response of elastomeric composites where the reinforcement is composed by cords with helically wound fibres is heavily compromised by fatigue and delamination phenomena occurring at cord-rubber as well as at the ply interfaces, since rubber and polymeric matrices are mainly vulnerable to the accumulation of deviatoric energy due to the shear stresses transferred across the surfaces. Despite the large diffusion of composites in a vast field of applications and the mature knowledge of their behaviour, some key mechanical aspects underlying failure mechanisms are still partially unclear. For example, stress amplification and strain localization are often difficult to predict by means of analytical solutions and averaging techniques that usually conceal stress gradients. In this work, we analyse coupling between torsional and tensile loads in twisted cords, which are adopted in many cases to reinforce composites and rubbers in tire applications. We provide a model characterized by an enriched cord-matrix mechanical interplay able to theoretically explain and predict actual stress distributions responsible for the onset of delamination and fatigue-guided phenomena that are experimentally observed in these composites. In particular, we demonstrate that the assumption of a monoclinic/trigonal behaviour for the mechanical response of the hierarchical strands allows to estimate, by means of analytical formulas and a homogenization approach, hitherto neglected shear stresses at the matrix-reinforcement interface. These stresses are transferred to the neighbouring regions, leading to post-elastic behaviour and failure events. Finite Element simulation results for rubber/cord composites under various boundary conditions highlight the discrepancies in mechanical behaviour between the proposed model and standard approaches in the literature, while experimental tests performed on composite rubber pads confirm theoretical predictions, providing qualitative evidence of the onset of cracks.
Cutolo, A.; Carotenuto, A. R.; Palumbo, S.; Bosia, F.; Pugno, N. M.; Fraldi, M.
Unveiling a new shear stress transfer mechanism in composites with helically wound hierarchical fibres / Cutolo, A.; Carotenuto, A. R.; Palumbo, S.; Bosia, F.; Pugno, N. M.; Fraldi, M.. - In: INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF MECHANICAL SCIENCES. - ISSN 0020-7403. - 192:(2021), pp. 106135.1-106135.23. [10.1016/j.ijmecsci.2020.106135]
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11572/287268
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