Liquid chemical droplets, as models of artificial life, when pushed away from equilibrium possess some life-like behaviors such as fission, fusion, movement and chemotaxis. Chemotaxis, directed motion in response to external gradients, is typically an important process in living systems, but certain artificial systems are also capable of this activity. Previously it was shown that droplet-based chemotactic systems when interfaced with biological systems can act as transporters to move cargo such as hydrogel alginate capsules containing living cells. Here the effectiveness of our system to transport different mammalian cell lines (H460, H1299, A549, HEK293T and HS68) was tested. It was discovered that some lung cancer cell lines release surfactants only when placed in the hydrogel capsules. These surfactants establish the interface between the encapsulated cells and the droplet and also support the chemotaxis of the droplet. Because of this, the droplet-mediated transport system is selective for living cells that produce biosurfactants. This is an example of how the integration of artificial life and biological life could be designed where the systems augment each other and function together as a unit. In this case the living system produces the surfactants that the droplet needs for cargo transport and the artificial system provides the transport for the otherwise sessile mammalian cells. Future applications of droplet-based cell handling that is able to distinguish between cells based not only on viability but cell type, developmental stage or other quantifiable traits are considered.

Autoselective transport of mammalian cells with a chemotactic droplet / Holler, S.; Hanczyc, M. M.. - In: SCIENTIFIC REPORTS. - ISSN 2045-2322. - ELETTRONICO. - 10:1(2020), pp. 552501-552510. [10.1038/s41598-020-62325-z]

Autoselective transport of mammalian cells with a chemotactic droplet

Holler S.;Hanczyc M. M.
2020-01-01

Abstract

Liquid chemical droplets, as models of artificial life, when pushed away from equilibrium possess some life-like behaviors such as fission, fusion, movement and chemotaxis. Chemotaxis, directed motion in response to external gradients, is typically an important process in living systems, but certain artificial systems are also capable of this activity. Previously it was shown that droplet-based chemotactic systems when interfaced with biological systems can act as transporters to move cargo such as hydrogel alginate capsules containing living cells. Here the effectiveness of our system to transport different mammalian cell lines (H460, H1299, A549, HEK293T and HS68) was tested. It was discovered that some lung cancer cell lines release surfactants only when placed in the hydrogel capsules. These surfactants establish the interface between the encapsulated cells and the droplet and also support the chemotaxis of the droplet. Because of this, the droplet-mediated transport system is selective for living cells that produce biosurfactants. This is an example of how the integration of artificial life and biological life could be designed where the systems augment each other and function together as a unit. In this case the living system produces the surfactants that the droplet needs for cargo transport and the artificial system provides the transport for the otherwise sessile mammalian cells. Future applications of droplet-based cell handling that is able to distinguish between cells based not only on viability but cell type, developmental stage or other quantifiable traits are considered.
2020
1
Holler, S.; Hanczyc, M. M.
Autoselective transport of mammalian cells with a chemotactic droplet / Holler, S.; Hanczyc, M. M.. - In: SCIENTIFIC REPORTS. - ISSN 2045-2322. - ELETTRONICO. - 10:1(2020), pp. 552501-552510. [10.1038/s41598-020-62325-z]
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Descrizione: Autoselective transport of mammalian cells with a chemotactic droplet
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11572/283337
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