Mountain landscapes provide a variety of cultural ecosystem services (CES), but recent developments such as land-use and climate changes, population growth or urbanization seem to lead more frequently to conflicts among users or restrict the use of natural resources. An enhanced understanding of such conflicts and limitations may improve decision-making and management of mountain landscapes and maintain high levels of CES supply. However, conceptual and empirical research on identifying and evaluating conflicts and limitations of use in qualitative, quantitative and spatial terms as well as interdependencies in socio-ecological systems (SES) is still rare, and suitable methods are underdeveloped. Therefore, this paper elaborates the outcomes of an expert workshop and presents eleven case studies related to different CES and various contexts to conceptualise conflicts and limitations of CES use in mountain regions, complemented by assessment approaches to facilitate their identification and management. Using a multidimensional framework, we find that conflicts were mostly related to socio-economic changes and an increasing recreational use, whereas limitations of use greatly depended on accessibility and legal issues. Our findings contribute to the advancement of research on CES and are particularly useful for landscape management and decision-making to develop sustainable solutions and maintain CES in mountain landscapes.

Cultural ecosystem services in mountain regions: Conceptualising conflicts among users and limitations of use / Schirpke, U.; Scolozzi, R.; Dean, G.; Haller, A.; Jager, H.; Kister, J.; Kovacs, B.; Sarmiento, F. O.; Sattler, B.; Schleyer, C.. - In: ECOSYSTEM SERVICES. - ISSN 2212-0416. - ELETTRONICO. - 46:(2020), p. 101210. [10.1016/j.ecoser.2020.101210]

Cultural ecosystem services in mountain regions: Conceptualising conflicts among users and limitations of use

Scolozzi R.;
2020

Abstract

Mountain landscapes provide a variety of cultural ecosystem services (CES), but recent developments such as land-use and climate changes, population growth or urbanization seem to lead more frequently to conflicts among users or restrict the use of natural resources. An enhanced understanding of such conflicts and limitations may improve decision-making and management of mountain landscapes and maintain high levels of CES supply. However, conceptual and empirical research on identifying and evaluating conflicts and limitations of use in qualitative, quantitative and spatial terms as well as interdependencies in socio-ecological systems (SES) is still rare, and suitable methods are underdeveloped. Therefore, this paper elaborates the outcomes of an expert workshop and presents eleven case studies related to different CES and various contexts to conceptualise conflicts and limitations of CES use in mountain regions, complemented by assessment approaches to facilitate their identification and management. Using a multidimensional framework, we find that conflicts were mostly related to socio-economic changes and an increasing recreational use, whereas limitations of use greatly depended on accessibility and legal issues. Our findings contribute to the advancement of research on CES and are particularly useful for landscape management and decision-making to develop sustainable solutions and maintain CES in mountain landscapes.
Schirpke, U.; Scolozzi, R.; Dean, G.; Haller, A.; Jager, H.; Kister, J.; Kovacs, B.; Sarmiento, F. O.; Sattler, B.; Schleyer, C.
Cultural ecosystem services in mountain regions: Conceptualising conflicts among users and limitations of use / Schirpke, U.; Scolozzi, R.; Dean, G.; Haller, A.; Jager, H.; Kister, J.; Kovacs, B.; Sarmiento, F. O.; Sattler, B.; Schleyer, C.. - In: ECOSYSTEM SERVICES. - ISSN 2212-0416. - ELETTRONICO. - 46:(2020), p. 101210. [10.1016/j.ecoser.2020.101210]
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11572/279566
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