Recent studies have shown how embodiment induced by multisensory bodily interactions between individuals can positively change social attitudes (closeness, empathy, racial biases). Here we use a simple neuroscience-inspired procedure to beam our human subjects into one of two distinct robots and demonstrate how this can readily increase acceptability and social closeness to that robot. Participants wore a Head Mounted Display tracking their head movements and displaying the 3D visual scene taken from the eyes of a robot which was positioned in front of a mirror and piloted by the subjects’ head movements. As a result, participants saw themselves as a robot. When participant’ and robot’s head movements were correlated, participants felt that they were incorporated into the robot with a sense of agency. Critically, the robot they embodied was judged more likeable and socially closer. Remarkably, we found that the beaming experience with correlated head movements and corresponding sensation of embodiment and social proximity, was independent of robots’ humanoid’s appearance. These findings not only reveal the ease of body-swapping, via visual-motor synchrony, into robots that do not share any clear human resemblance, but they may also pave a new way to make our future robotic helpers socially acceptable.

Embodiment into a robot increases its acceptability / Ventre-Dominey, J.; Gibert, G.; Bosse-Platiere, M.; Farne, A.; Dominey, P. F.; Pavani, F.. - In: SCIENTIFIC REPORTS. - ISSN 2045-2322. - 9:1(2019), pp. 1008301-1008310. [10.1038/s41598-019-46528-7]

Embodiment into a robot increases its acceptability

Farne A.;Pavani F.
2019

Abstract

Recent studies have shown how embodiment induced by multisensory bodily interactions between individuals can positively change social attitudes (closeness, empathy, racial biases). Here we use a simple neuroscience-inspired procedure to beam our human subjects into one of two distinct robots and demonstrate how this can readily increase acceptability and social closeness to that robot. Participants wore a Head Mounted Display tracking their head movements and displaying the 3D visual scene taken from the eyes of a robot which was positioned in front of a mirror and piloted by the subjects’ head movements. As a result, participants saw themselves as a robot. When participant’ and robot’s head movements were correlated, participants felt that they were incorporated into the robot with a sense of agency. Critically, the robot they embodied was judged more likeable and socially closer. Remarkably, we found that the beaming experience with correlated head movements and corresponding sensation of embodiment and social proximity, was independent of robots’ humanoid’s appearance. These findings not only reveal the ease of body-swapping, via visual-motor synchrony, into robots that do not share any clear human resemblance, but they may also pave a new way to make our future robotic helpers socially acceptable.
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Ventre-Dominey, J.; Gibert, G.; Bosse-Platiere, M.; Farne, A.; Dominey, P. F.; Pavani, F.
Embodiment into a robot increases its acceptability / Ventre-Dominey, J.; Gibert, G.; Bosse-Platiere, M.; Farne, A.; Dominey, P. F.; Pavani, F.. - In: SCIENTIFIC REPORTS. - ISSN 2045-2322. - 9:1(2019), pp. 1008301-1008310. [10.1038/s41598-019-46528-7]
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11572/252327
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