Neuroimaging studies suggest that areas in the lateral occipitotemporal cortex (LOTC) play an important role in the perception of social actions. However, it is unclear what precisely about social actions these areas represent: perceptual features that may be indicative of social actions – such as the presence of persons in a scene, their orientation toward each other, and in particular the directedness of action movements toward persons or other targets – or more abstract representations that capture whether an action is meant to be social. In two fMRI experiments, we used representational similarity analysis (RSA) to test whether LOTC is sensitive to perceptual action components important for social interpretation and/or more general representations of sociality (Experiment 1) and implied person-directedness (Experiment 2). We found that LOTC is sensitive to perceptual action components (person presence, person orientation, and action directedness toward different types of recipients). By contrast, more general levels of sociality and implied person-directedness were not captured by LOTC. Our findings suggest that regions in LOTC provide the perceptual basis for social action interpretation but challenge accounts that posit specialization at more general levels sensitive to social actions and sociality as such. We propose that the interpretation of an action – in terms of sociality or other intentional aspects – arises from the interaction of multiple areas in processing relevant action components in a situation-dependent manner.

Lateral occipitotemporal cortex encodes perceptual components of social actions rather than abstract representations of sociality / Wurm, M. F.; Caramazza, A.. - In: NEUROIMAGE. - ISSN 1053-8119. - STAMPA. - 202:(2019), p. 116153. [10.1016/j.neuroimage.2019.116153]

Lateral occipitotemporal cortex encodes perceptual components of social actions rather than abstract representations of sociality

Wurm M. F.;Caramazza A.
2019

Abstract

Neuroimaging studies suggest that areas in the lateral occipitotemporal cortex (LOTC) play an important role in the perception of social actions. However, it is unclear what precisely about social actions these areas represent: perceptual features that may be indicative of social actions – such as the presence of persons in a scene, their orientation toward each other, and in particular the directedness of action movements toward persons or other targets – or more abstract representations that capture whether an action is meant to be social. In two fMRI experiments, we used representational similarity analysis (RSA) to test whether LOTC is sensitive to perceptual action components important for social interpretation and/or more general representations of sociality (Experiment 1) and implied person-directedness (Experiment 2). We found that LOTC is sensitive to perceptual action components (person presence, person orientation, and action directedness toward different types of recipients). By contrast, more general levels of sociality and implied person-directedness were not captured by LOTC. Our findings suggest that regions in LOTC provide the perceptual basis for social action interpretation but challenge accounts that posit specialization at more general levels sensitive to social actions and sociality as such. We propose that the interpretation of an action – in terms of sociality or other intentional aspects – arises from the interaction of multiple areas in processing relevant action components in a situation-dependent manner.
Wurm, M. F.; Caramazza, A.
Lateral occipitotemporal cortex encodes perceptual components of social actions rather than abstract representations of sociality / Wurm, M. F.; Caramazza, A.. - In: NEUROIMAGE. - ISSN 1053-8119. - STAMPA. - 202:(2019), p. 116153. [10.1016/j.neuroimage.2019.116153]
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11572/251935
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