Reading involves a process of matching an orthographic input with stored representations in lexical memory. The masked priming paradigm has become a standard tool for investigating this process. Use of existing results from this paradigm can be limited by the precision of the data and the need for cross-experiment comparisons that lack normal experimental controls. Here, we present a single, large, high-precision, multicondition experiment to address these problems. Over 1,000 participants from 14 sites responded to 840 trials involving 28 different types of orthographically related primes (e.g., castfe-CASTLE) in a lexical decision task, as well as completing measures of spelling and vocabulary. The data were indeed highly sensitive to differences between conditions: After correction for multiple comparisons, prime type condition differences of 2.90 ms and above reached significance at the 5% level. This article presents the method of data collection and preliminary findings from these data, which included replications of the most widely agreed-upon differences between prime types, further evidence for systematic individual differences in susceptibility to priming, and new evidence regarding lexical properties associated with a target word's susceptibility to priming. These analyses will form a basis for the use of these data in quantitative model fitting and evaluation and for future exploration of these data that will inform and motivate new experiments.

A behavioral database for masked form priming / Adelman, James S.; Johnson, Rebecca L.; Mccormick, Samantha F.; Mckague, Meredith; Kinoshita, Sachiko; Bowers, Jeffrey S.; Perry, Jason R.; Lupker, Stephen J.; Forster, Kenneth I.; Cortese, Michael J.; Scaltritti, Michele; Aschenbrenner, Andrew J.; Coane, Jennifer H.; White, Laurence; Yap, Melvin J.; Davis, Chris; Kim, Jeesun; Davis, Colin J.. - In: BEHAVIOR RESEARCH METHODS. - ISSN 1554-3528. - 46:4(2014), pp. 1052-1067. [10.3758/s13428-013-0442-y]

A behavioral database for masked form priming

Michele Scaltritti;
2014

Abstract

Reading involves a process of matching an orthographic input with stored representations in lexical memory. The masked priming paradigm has become a standard tool for investigating this process. Use of existing results from this paradigm can be limited by the precision of the data and the need for cross-experiment comparisons that lack normal experimental controls. Here, we present a single, large, high-precision, multicondition experiment to address these problems. Over 1,000 participants from 14 sites responded to 840 trials involving 28 different types of orthographically related primes (e.g., castfe-CASTLE) in a lexical decision task, as well as completing measures of spelling and vocabulary. The data were indeed highly sensitive to differences between conditions: After correction for multiple comparisons, prime type condition differences of 2.90 ms and above reached significance at the 5% level. This article presents the method of data collection and preliminary findings from these data, which included replications of the most widely agreed-upon differences between prime types, further evidence for systematic individual differences in susceptibility to priming, and new evidence regarding lexical properties associated with a target word's susceptibility to priming. These analyses will form a basis for the use of these data in quantitative model fitting and evaluation and for future exploration of these data that will inform and motivate new experiments.
4
Adelman, James S.; Johnson, Rebecca L.; Mccormick, Samantha F.; Mckague, Meredith; Kinoshita, Sachiko; Bowers, Jeffrey S.; Perry, Jason R.; Lupker, Stephen J.; Forster, Kenneth I.; Cortese, Michael J.; Scaltritti, Michele; Aschenbrenner, Andrew J.; Coane, Jennifer H.; White, Laurence; Yap, Melvin J.; Davis, Chris; Kim, Jeesun; Davis, Colin J.
A behavioral database for masked form priming / Adelman, James S.; Johnson, Rebecca L.; Mccormick, Samantha F.; Mckague, Meredith; Kinoshita, Sachiko; Bowers, Jeffrey S.; Perry, Jason R.; Lupker, Stephen J.; Forster, Kenneth I.; Cortese, Michael J.; Scaltritti, Michele; Aschenbrenner, Andrew J.; Coane, Jennifer H.; White, Laurence; Yap, Melvin J.; Davis, Chris; Kim, Jeesun; Davis, Colin J.. - In: BEHAVIOR RESEARCH METHODS. - ISSN 1554-3528. - 46:4(2014), pp. 1052-1067. [10.3758/s13428-013-0442-y]
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11572/226189
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