The septum is an evolutionarily well-conserved part of the limbic system. It is known to be involved in many aspects of social behavior and is considered a key node of the social behavior network, together with the preoptic area. Involvement of these two brain regions has been recently observed in newly hatched chicks exposed to the natural motion of a living conspecific. However, it is unknown whether these areas respond also to simple motion cues that elicit animacy perception in humans and social predispositions in chicks. For example, naive chicks are attracted by visual objects that appear to spontaneously change their speed (an index of self-propulsion, typical of animate creatures). Here we show that the right septum and the preoptic area of newly hatched visually naive chicks exposed to speed changes have higher neuronal activity (revealed by c-Fos expression), compared with that of chicks exposed to constant motion. We thus found an involvement of these two areas in the perception of motion cues associated with animacy in newly hatched chicks without any previous visual experience. This demonstrates their early involvement in processing simple motion cues that allow the detection of animate creatures and elicit social predispositions in this animal model, as well as preferential attention in human infants and the perception of animacy in human adults. (C) 2017 IBRO.

Dynamic features of animate motion activate septal and preoptic areas in visually naïve chicks ( Gallus gallus ) / Lorenzi, Elena; Mayer, Uwe; Rosa Salva, Orsola; Vallortigara, Giorgio. - In: NEUROSCIENCE. - ISSN 0306-4522. - 354:(2017), pp. 54-68. [10.1016/j.neuroscience.2017.04.022]

Dynamic features of animate motion activate septal and preoptic areas in visually naïve chicks ( Gallus gallus )

Lorenzi, Elena;Mayer, Uwe;Rosa Salva, Orsola;Vallortigara, Giorgio
2017-01-01

Abstract

The septum is an evolutionarily well-conserved part of the limbic system. It is known to be involved in many aspects of social behavior and is considered a key node of the social behavior network, together with the preoptic area. Involvement of these two brain regions has been recently observed in newly hatched chicks exposed to the natural motion of a living conspecific. However, it is unknown whether these areas respond also to simple motion cues that elicit animacy perception in humans and social predispositions in chicks. For example, naive chicks are attracted by visual objects that appear to spontaneously change their speed (an index of self-propulsion, typical of animate creatures). Here we show that the right septum and the preoptic area of newly hatched visually naive chicks exposed to speed changes have higher neuronal activity (revealed by c-Fos expression), compared with that of chicks exposed to constant motion. We thus found an involvement of these two areas in the perception of motion cues associated with animacy in newly hatched chicks without any previous visual experience. This demonstrates their early involvement in processing simple motion cues that allow the detection of animate creatures and elicit social predispositions in this animal model, as well as preferential attention in human infants and the perception of animacy in human adults. (C) 2017 IBRO.
Lorenzi, Elena; Mayer, Uwe; Rosa Salva, Orsola; Vallortigara, Giorgio
Dynamic features of animate motion activate septal and preoptic areas in visually naïve chicks ( Gallus gallus ) / Lorenzi, Elena; Mayer, Uwe; Rosa Salva, Orsola; Vallortigara, Giorgio. - In: NEUROSCIENCE. - ISSN 0306-4522. - 354:(2017), pp. 54-68. [10.1016/j.neuroscience.2017.04.022]
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11572/174447
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