Umbilical cord blood (UCB) is an important source for stem cells used in clinical treat- ments. For this purpose, UCB has to be collected at birth and stored in biobanks. The discourse about UCB biobanking practices commonly holds that it occurs in two opposite economies, the public sector and a competing private one. They correspond with moral economies of gift-giving in a redistributive economy versus private ownership of cord blood in a market economy. Our analysis of UCB banking in Europe shows that this opposition narrative is both empirically and analytically unsatisfactory. Using the analytic concepts of entanglement (Callon) and biomedical platforms (Keating and Cambrosio), we demonstrate how the network of actors, objects, interests and prac- tices in biobanking creates different kinds of value and shared issues across public and private ser- vices. Our case study illustrates how the interrelation between technical, ethical, economic and logistical considerations plays out and generates a field of practices where redistributive and market economies coexist, are co-dependent and hybridize each other. The narrative of opposition there- fore can inform STS studies regarding the normative values written into the public facing side of biobanking, but bioeconomic analyses benefit from building on concepts that enable the examina- tion of the complex interrelations between the wider network of heterogeneous elements on which UCB banking relies.

The hybrid bioeconomy of umbilical cord blood banking: Re-examining the narrative of opposition between public and private services / Huaskeller, Christine; Beltrame, Lorenzo. - In: BIOSOCIETIES. - ISSN 1745-8552. - ELETTRONICO. - 11:4(2016), pp. 415-434. [10.1057/biosoc.2015.45]

The hybrid bioeconomy of umbilical cord blood banking: Re-examining the narrative of opposition between public and private services

Beltrame, Lorenzo
2016

Abstract

Umbilical cord blood (UCB) is an important source for stem cells used in clinical treat- ments. For this purpose, UCB has to be collected at birth and stored in biobanks. The discourse about UCB biobanking practices commonly holds that it occurs in two opposite economies, the public sector and a competing private one. They correspond with moral economies of gift-giving in a redistributive economy versus private ownership of cord blood in a market economy. Our analysis of UCB banking in Europe shows that this opposition narrative is both empirically and analytically unsatisfactory. Using the analytic concepts of entanglement (Callon) and biomedical platforms (Keating and Cambrosio), we demonstrate how the network of actors, objects, interests and prac- tices in biobanking creates different kinds of value and shared issues across public and private ser- vices. Our case study illustrates how the interrelation between technical, ethical, economic and logistical considerations plays out and generates a field of practices where redistributive and market economies coexist, are co-dependent and hybridize each other. The narrative of opposition there- fore can inform STS studies regarding the normative values written into the public facing side of biobanking, but bioeconomic analyses benefit from building on concepts that enable the examina- tion of the complex interrelations between the wider network of heterogeneous elements on which UCB banking relies.
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Huaskeller, Christine; Beltrame, Lorenzo
The hybrid bioeconomy of umbilical cord blood banking: Re-examining the narrative of opposition between public and private services / Huaskeller, Christine; Beltrame, Lorenzo. - In: BIOSOCIETIES. - ISSN 1745-8552. - ELETTRONICO. - 11:4(2016), pp. 415-434. [10.1057/biosoc.2015.45]
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11572/170195
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