Visual stimulation produces oscillatory gamma responses in human primary visual cortex (V1) that also relate to visual perception. We have shown previously that peak gamma frequency positively correlates with central V1 cortical surface area. We hypothesized that people with larger V1 would have smaller receptive fields and that receptive field size, not V1 area, might explain this relationship. Here we set out to test this hypothesis directly by investigating the relationship between fMRI estimated population receptive field (pRF) size and gamma frequency in V1. We stimulated both the near-center and periphery of the visual field using both large and small stimuli in each location and replicated our previous finding of a positive correlation between V1 surface area and peak gamma frequency. Counter to our expectation, we found that between participants V1 size (and not PRF size) accounted for most of the variability in gamma frequency. Within-participants we found that gamma frequency increased, rather than decreased, with stimulus eccentricity directly contradicting our initial hypothesis.

Gamma frequency and the spatial tuning of primary visual cortex / Gregory, Sarah; Fuscà, Marco; Rees, Geraint; Schwarzkopf, D. Samuel; Barnes, Gareth. - In: PLOS ONE. - ISSN 1932-6203. - 11:6(2016), pp. e0157374.1-e0157374.12. [10.1371/journal.pone.0157374]

Gamma frequency and the spatial tuning of primary visual cortex

Fuscà, Marco;
2016-01-01

Abstract

Visual stimulation produces oscillatory gamma responses in human primary visual cortex (V1) that also relate to visual perception. We have shown previously that peak gamma frequency positively correlates with central V1 cortical surface area. We hypothesized that people with larger V1 would have smaller receptive fields and that receptive field size, not V1 area, might explain this relationship. Here we set out to test this hypothesis directly by investigating the relationship between fMRI estimated population receptive field (pRF) size and gamma frequency in V1. We stimulated both the near-center and periphery of the visual field using both large and small stimuli in each location and replicated our previous finding of a positive correlation between V1 surface area and peak gamma frequency. Counter to our expectation, we found that between participants V1 size (and not PRF size) accounted for most of the variability in gamma frequency. Within-participants we found that gamma frequency increased, rather than decreased, with stimulus eccentricity directly contradicting our initial hypothesis.
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Gregory, Sarah; Fuscà, Marco; Rees, Geraint; Schwarzkopf, D. Samuel; Barnes, Gareth
Gamma frequency and the spatial tuning of primary visual cortex / Gregory, Sarah; Fuscà, Marco; Rees, Geraint; Schwarzkopf, D. Samuel; Barnes, Gareth. - In: PLOS ONE. - ISSN 1932-6203. - 11:6(2016), pp. e0157374.1-e0157374.12. [10.1371/journal.pone.0157374]
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11572/163633
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