Dynamic causal modeling (DCM) is a method to non-invasively assess effective connectivity between brain regions. 'Musicogenic epilepsy' is a rare reflex epilepsy syndrome in which seizures can be elicited by musical stimuli and thus represents a unique possibility to investigate complex human brain networks and test connectivity analysis tools. We investigated effective connectivity in a case of musicogenic epilepsy using DCM for fMRI, high-density (hd-) EEG and MEG and validated results with intracranial EEG recordings. A patient with musicogenic seizures was examined using hd-EEG/fMRI and simultaneous '256-channel hd-EEG'/'whole head MEG' to characterize the epileptogenic focus and propagation effects using source analysis techniques and DCM. Results were validated with invasive EEG recordings. We recorded one seizure with hd-EEG/fMRI and four auras with hd-EEG/MEG. During the seizures, increases of activity could be observed in the right mesial temporal region as well as bilateral mesial frontal regions. Effective connectivity analysis of fMRI and hd-EEG/MEG indicated that right mesial temporal neuronal activity drives changes in the frontal areas consistently in all three modalities, which was confirmed by the results of invasive EEG recordings. Seizures thus seem to originate in the right mesial temporal lobe and propagate to mesial frontal regions. Using DCM for fMRI, hd-EEG and MEG we were able to correctly localize focus and propagation of epileptic activity and thereby characterize the underlying epileptic network in a patient with musicogenic epilepsy. The concordance between all three functional modalities validated by invasive monitoring is noteworthy, both for epileptic activity spread as well as for effective connectivity analysis in general.

Multimodal effective connectivity analysis reveals seizure focus and propagation in musicogenic epilepsy

Braun, Heinrich Christoph;
2015

Abstract

Dynamic causal modeling (DCM) is a method to non-invasively assess effective connectivity between brain regions. 'Musicogenic epilepsy' is a rare reflex epilepsy syndrome in which seizures can be elicited by musical stimuli and thus represents a unique possibility to investigate complex human brain networks and test connectivity analysis tools. We investigated effective connectivity in a case of musicogenic epilepsy using DCM for fMRI, high-density (hd-) EEG and MEG and validated results with intracranial EEG recordings. A patient with musicogenic seizures was examined using hd-EEG/fMRI and simultaneous '256-channel hd-EEG'/'whole head MEG' to characterize the epileptogenic focus and propagation effects using source analysis techniques and DCM. Results were validated with invasive EEG recordings. We recorded one seizure with hd-EEG/fMRI and four auras with hd-EEG/MEG. During the seizures, increases of activity could be observed in the right mesial temporal region as well as bilateral mesial frontal regions. Effective connectivity analysis of fMRI and hd-EEG/MEG indicated that right mesial temporal neuronal activity drives changes in the frontal areas consistently in all three modalities, which was confirmed by the results of invasive EEG recordings. Seizures thus seem to originate in the right mesial temporal lobe and propagate to mesial frontal regions. Using DCM for fMRI, hd-EEG and MEG we were able to correctly localize focus and propagation of epileptic activity and thereby characterize the underlying epileptic network in a patient with musicogenic epilepsy. The concordance between all three functional modalities validated by invasive monitoring is noteworthy, both for epileptic activity spread as well as for effective connectivity analysis in general.
Klamer, Silke; Rona, Sabine; Elshahabi, Adham; Lerche, Holger; Braun, Heinrich Christoph; Honegger, Jürgen; Erb, Michael; Focke, Niels K.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11572/138031
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