The aim of the research reported by this study was on the one hand to identify what colors were associated with particular words, by objectifying them in color stimuli on the screen of a monitor; and on the other hand to verify whether some words denoted colors which were either particularly well defined or confused with others. The research was conducted in relation to a specific language (Italian). In an experiment using special software, the subjects were asked to produce colors directly, instead of choosing among a number of colors presented on the screen. The results showed that (i) it is possible to identify the colors to which the terms of a language refer; that (ii) the ‘beautiful’ colors which the subjects were requested to produce (Yellow, Red, Blue and Green) were very similar to the corresponding unique hues; that (iii) among the mixed hues there were balanced colors, i.e. ones exactly midway between two consecutive unique colors (Orange and Purple); that (iv) Turquoise and Lime have a ‘basicness’ and as such can be added to Berlin & Kay’s list of basic color terms; and that (v) some hues coincide (Azure and Cerulean; Orange, Red-Yellow and Carrot; Lime and Yellow-Green), so that their color terms can be considered synonyms. Our most interesting finding, however, is that (vi) Lime and Turquoise integrate a color circle of opponent type, since four more colors intermediate to the four unique hues are added: in fact, in the two Green-Yellow and Green-Blue quadrants, respectively, they would occupy the places corresponding to the colors Violet and Orange in the other two quadrants (Red-Blue and Red-Yellow). Hence, instead of the well-known triad of ‘secondary’ colors – Green, Orange, Purple – of the artistic tradition, colors intermediate between the unique (no longer primary) hues would be Orange, Violet, Turquoise, and Lime.

Color names, stimulus color and their subjective links

Albertazzi, Liliana;
2016

Abstract

The aim of the research reported by this study was on the one hand to identify what colors were associated with particular words, by objectifying them in color stimuli on the screen of a monitor; and on the other hand to verify whether some words denoted colors which were either particularly well defined or confused with others. The research was conducted in relation to a specific language (Italian). In an experiment using special software, the subjects were asked to produce colors directly, instead of choosing among a number of colors presented on the screen. The results showed that (i) it is possible to identify the colors to which the terms of a language refer; that (ii) the ‘beautiful’ colors which the subjects were requested to produce (Yellow, Red, Blue and Green) were very similar to the corresponding unique hues; that (iii) among the mixed hues there were balanced colors, i.e. ones exactly midway between two consecutive unique colors (Orange and Purple); that (iv) Turquoise and Lime have a ‘basicness’ and as such can be added to Berlin & Kay’s list of basic color terms; and that (v) some hues coincide (Azure and Cerulean; Orange, Red-Yellow and Carrot; Lime and Yellow-Green), so that their color terms can be considered synonyms. Our most interesting finding, however, is that (vi) Lime and Turquoise integrate a color circle of opponent type, since four more colors intermediate to the four unique hues are added: in fact, in the two Green-Yellow and Green-Blue quadrants, respectively, they would occupy the places corresponding to the colors Violet and Orange in the other two quadrants (Red-Blue and Red-Yellow). Hence, instead of the well-known triad of ‘secondary’ colors – Green, Orange, Purple – of the artistic tradition, colors intermediate between the unique (no longer primary) hues would be Orange, Violet, Turquoise, and Lime.
Albertazzi, Liliana; Da Pos, Osvaldo
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11572/117712
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