When presented with an auditory sequence, the brain acts as a predictive-coding device that extracts regularities in the transition probabilities between sounds and detects unexpected deviations from these regularities. Does such prediction require conscious vigilance, or does it continue to unfold automatically in the sleeping brain? The mismatch negativity and P300 components of the auditory event-related potential, reflecting two steps of auditory novelty detection, have been inconsistently observed in the various sleep stages. To clarify whether these steps remain during sleep, we recorded simultaneous electroencephalographic and magnetoencephalographic signals during wakefulness and during sleep in normal subjects listening to a hierarchical auditory paradigm including short-term (local) and long-term (global) regularities. The global response, reflected in the P300, vanished during sleep, in line with the hypothesis that it is a correlate of high-level conscious error detection. The local mismatch response remained across all sleep stages (N1, N2, and REM sleep), but with an incomplete structure; compared with wakefulness, a specific peak reflecting prediction error vanished during sleep. Those results indicate that sleep leaves initial auditory processing and passive sensory response adaptation intact, but specifically disrupts both short-term and long-term auditory predictive coding.

Disruption of hierarchical predictive coding during sleep / Strauss, Melanie; Sitt, Jacobo D.; King, Jean Remi; Elbaz, Maxime; Azizi, Leila; Buiatti, Marco; Naccache, Lionel; Van Wassenhove, Virginie; Dehaene, Stanislas Pierre Joseph. - In: PROCEEDINGS OF THE NATIONAL ACADEMY OF SCIENCES OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA. - ISSN 0027-8424. - ELETTRONICO. - 112:11(2015), pp. E1353-E1362. [10.1073/pnas.1501026112]

Disruption of hierarchical predictive coding during sleep

Buiatti, Marco;Dehaene, Stanislas Pierre Joseph
2015-01-01

Abstract

When presented with an auditory sequence, the brain acts as a predictive-coding device that extracts regularities in the transition probabilities between sounds and detects unexpected deviations from these regularities. Does such prediction require conscious vigilance, or does it continue to unfold automatically in the sleeping brain? The mismatch negativity and P300 components of the auditory event-related potential, reflecting two steps of auditory novelty detection, have been inconsistently observed in the various sleep stages. To clarify whether these steps remain during sleep, we recorded simultaneous electroencephalographic and magnetoencephalographic signals during wakefulness and during sleep in normal subjects listening to a hierarchical auditory paradigm including short-term (local) and long-term (global) regularities. The global response, reflected in the P300, vanished during sleep, in line with the hypothesis that it is a correlate of high-level conscious error detection. The local mismatch response remained across all sleep stages (N1, N2, and REM sleep), but with an incomplete structure; compared with wakefulness, a specific peak reflecting prediction error vanished during sleep. Those results indicate that sleep leaves initial auditory processing and passive sensory response adaptation intact, but specifically disrupts both short-term and long-term auditory predictive coding.
11
Strauss, Melanie; Sitt, Jacobo D.; King, Jean Remi; Elbaz, Maxime; Azizi, Leila; Buiatti, Marco; Naccache, Lionel; Van Wassenhove, Virginie; Dehaene, Stanislas Pierre Joseph
Disruption of hierarchical predictive coding during sleep / Strauss, Melanie; Sitt, Jacobo D.; King, Jean Remi; Elbaz, Maxime; Azizi, Leila; Buiatti, Marco; Naccache, Lionel; Van Wassenhove, Virginie; Dehaene, Stanislas Pierre Joseph. - In: PROCEEDINGS OF THE NATIONAL ACADEMY OF SCIENCES OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA. - ISSN 0027-8424. - ELETTRONICO. - 112:11(2015), pp. E1353-E1362. [10.1073/pnas.1501026112]
File in questo prodotto:
Non ci sono file associati a questo prodotto.

I documenti in IRIS sono protetti da copyright e tutti i diritti sono riservati, salvo diversa indicazione

Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11572/111495
Citazioni
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.pmc??? 66
  • Scopus 113
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.isi??? ND
social impact