Three-dimensional (3D) X-ray imaging methods have advanced tremendously during recent years. Traditional tomography uses absorption as the contrast mechanism, but for many purposes its sensitivity is limited. The introduction of diffraction, small-angle scattering, refraction, and phase contrasts has increased the sensitivity, especially in materials composed of light elements (for example, carbon and oxygen). X-ray spectroscopy, in principle, offers in-formation on element composition and chemical environment. However, its application in 3D imaging over macroscopic length scales has not been possible for light elements. Here we introduce a new hard-X-ray spectroscopic tomography with a unique sensitivity to light elements. In this method, dark-field section images are obtained directly without any reconstruction algorithms. We apply the method to acquire the 3D structure and map the chemical bonding in selected samples relevant to materials science. The novel aspects make this technique a powerful new imaging tool, with an inherent access to the molecular-level chemical environment.

Direct tomography with chemical-bond contrast

Monaco, Giulio;
2011

Abstract

Three-dimensional (3D) X-ray imaging methods have advanced tremendously during recent years. Traditional tomography uses absorption as the contrast mechanism, but for many purposes its sensitivity is limited. The introduction of diffraction, small-angle scattering, refraction, and phase contrasts has increased the sensitivity, especially in materials composed of light elements (for example, carbon and oxygen). X-ray spectroscopy, in principle, offers in-formation on element composition and chemical environment. However, its application in 3D imaging over macroscopic length scales has not been possible for light elements. Here we introduce a new hard-X-ray spectroscopic tomography with a unique sensitivity to light elements. In this method, dark-field section images are obtained directly without any reconstruction algorithms. We apply the method to acquire the 3D structure and map the chemical bonding in selected samples relevant to materials science. The novel aspects make this technique a powerful new imaging tool, with an inherent access to the molecular-level chemical environment.
S., Huotari; T., Pylkkanen; R., Verbeni; Monaco, Giulio; K., Hamalainen
File in questo prodotto:
File Dimensione Formato  
Huotari_11_NatM.pdf

Solo gestori archivio

Tipologia: Versione editoriale (Publisher’s layout)
Licenza: Tutti i diritti riservati (All rights reserved)
Dimensione 1.04 MB
Formato Adobe PDF
1.04 MB Adobe PDF   Visualizza/Apri

I documenti in IRIS sono protetti da copyright e tutti i diritti sono riservati, salvo diversa indicazione

Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11572/101138
Citazioni
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.pmc??? ND
  • Scopus 77
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.isi??? 76
social impact