Berthold of Moosburg was a fourteenth-century German Dominican. He was called to direct the Dominican studium in Cologne in 1335, where he was involved in resolving the crisis caused by the conviction of Meister Eckhart’s doctrines (1329). The doctrinal solution proposed by Berthold is contained in his commentary on Proclus’s Elements of Theology (Expositio super elementationem theologicam Procli), the only medieval commentary on Proclus, a veritable summa of Neoplatonism. Berthold’s project was to promote the return to the Neoplatonic tradition of the German Dominicans, dating back to Albertus Magnus. He demonstrated that the Albertine school was an autonomous and unitary cultural identity that had its roots in ancient wisdom, of which Proclus, according to Berthold, was the most outstanding exponent. Berthold sees in the Greek diadochus a “divine man” who could scan the divine properties, which are present in the totality of the real world, and therefore ascend to God only by means of the natural reason. In the same way, according to Berthold, the philosopher who studies Proclian theorems performs a cognitive ascent which leads him to the contemplation of God. This is possible by virtue of the presence in man of a divine faculty, i.e., the “One of the soul.”

Berthold of Moosburg (updated version) / Zavattero, Irene. - ELETTRONICO. - (2018). [10.1007/978-94-024-1151-5_82-2]

Berthold of Moosburg (updated version)

Zavattero, Irene
2018-01-01

Abstract

Berthold of Moosburg was a fourteenth-century German Dominican. He was called to direct the Dominican studium in Cologne in 1335, where he was involved in resolving the crisis caused by the conviction of Meister Eckhart’s doctrines (1329). The doctrinal solution proposed by Berthold is contained in his commentary on Proclus’s Elements of Theology (Expositio super elementationem theologicam Procli), the only medieval commentary on Proclus, a veritable summa of Neoplatonism. Berthold’s project was to promote the return to the Neoplatonic tradition of the German Dominicans, dating back to Albertus Magnus. He demonstrated that the Albertine school was an autonomous and unitary cultural identity that had its roots in ancient wisdom, of which Proclus, according to Berthold, was the most outstanding exponent. Berthold sees in the Greek diadochus a “divine man” who could scan the divine properties, which are present in the totality of the real world, and therefore ascend to God only by means of the natural reason. In the same way, according to Berthold, the philosopher who studies Proclian theorems performs a cognitive ascent which leads him to the contemplation of God. This is possible by virtue of the presence in man of a divine faculty, i.e., the “One of the soul.”
Encyclopedia of Medieval Philosophy: philosophy between 500 and 1500
Dordrecht
Springer
Zavattero, Irene
Berthold of Moosburg (updated version) / Zavattero, Irene. - ELETTRONICO. - (2018). [10.1007/978-94-024-1151-5_82-2]
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11572/224013
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